Forefront UAG 2010 End of Life Statement

Today, Microsoft announced the end of life for the Forefront UAG 2010 product. Microsoft will continue to provide mainstream support for UAG until April 14, 2015, and extended support until April 14, 2020. Existing customers with active Software Assurance on their existing UAG licenses as of December 1, 2013, may add new UAG server instances, users, and devices without having to purchase additional UAG licenses. In addition, existing customers who have purchased Forefront UAG server licenses will be given upgrade rights to Windows Server 2012 R2, which provides some of the remote access features found in Forefront UAG. For example, Windows Server 2012 R2 supports DirectAccess, client-based VPN, and reverse web proxy with new Web Application Proxy role.

With regard to license upgrade rights, users are entitled to a Windows Server 2012 R2 license for each Forefront UAG server license (or External Connector license) they currently own. Software Assurance for UAG can still be purchased until January 1, 2014. Forefront UAG 2010 will be removed from the pricelist on July 1, 2014. Forefront UAG 2010 will continue to be available from Microsoft OEM hardware partners like Iron Networks for the foreseeable future, however.

How to Install and Configure KB2862152 for DirectAccess

Microsoft recently released security advisory 2862152 to address a vulnerability in IPsec that could allow DirectAccess security feature bypass. The associated update addresses an issue with how the DirectAccess client authenticates with a DirectAccess server. Without the update, it is possible for an attacker to launch a man-in-the-middle attack to intercept DirectAccess communication.

The update itself does not resolve the issue directly, however. The update simply allows administrators to configure DirectAccess clients using specific registry settings to enforce more stringent checks during IPsec negotiation after the update is installed. The challenge with this update is that the documentation contained within the knowledge base article is extremely detailed and includes information that pertains to many different remote access scenarios, not just DirectAccess. This has led to much confusion, and many administrators are unclear for which clients and deployment scenarios the registry changes are required.

For DirectAccess deployments, the update needs to be applied to all of your DirectAccess clients. The update does NOT need to be applied to the DirectAccess server. The registry settings required on the client will be dictated based on the configured authentication method for your DirectAccess deployment. If you have configured DirectAccess to use certificate-based authentication by checking selecting the Use computer certificates option as shown below, you’ll only need to make registry settings changes on your Windows 7 clients. Windows 8/8.1 clients DO NOT require any changes be made to the registry when DirectAccess is configured to use certificate-based authentication.

Microsoft Security Update KB2862152 for DirectAccess

If you are NOT using computer certificates for authentication, then you must make registry changes to all of your Windows 8/8.1 clients. For detailed, prescriptive guidance on implementing the client-side registry changes required to support this update and mitigate this vulnerability, Jason Jones has done a wonderful job documenting those steps specifically, so I’ll refer you to his post here.

You can find the update for KB2862152 for all supported clients here.

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