Hotfix Available to Disable NRPT on Windows 8.x DirectAccess Clients

Updated April 9, 2015: The hotfix referred to in this article is now included in the November 2014 update rollup for Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2. You will receive an error message when installing this update on Windows 8.x clients with the update rollup installed. More details here.

The Network Location Server (NLS) is a critical infrastructure component for DirectAccess deployments. The NLS is used by DirectAccess clients to determine if the client is located inside or outside of the corporate network. If the NLS becomes unavailable, DirectAccess clients that are already outside the corporate network are unaffected. However, DirectAccess clients that are inside the corporate network will mistakenly believe that they are outside and the Name Resolution Policy Table (NRPT) will be enabled, forcing name resolution requests for hosts in the internal namespace to be sent to the DNS64 service running on the DirectAccess server. If the DirectAccess server is unreachable from the internal network (a common scenario for a variety of reasons), DirectAccess clients inside the corporate network will be unable to connect to any local network resources by name until the NLS is once again reachable.

Configuring the Network Connectivity Assistant to Allow DirectAccess clients to use local name resolution does not resolve this issue. Although it sounds intuitive, it doesn’t resolve this specific issue where the NLS is unreachable.

Hotfix Available to Disable NRPT on Windows 8.x DirectAccess Clients

When the option to Allow DirectAccess clients to use local name resolution is enabled, the client can only choose to disconnect (use local name resolution) after it has successfully established a connection to the DirectAccess server. If the DirectAccess connection shows that it is still connecting, the option to disconnect is not available.

Hotfix Available to Disable NRPT on Windows 8.x DirectAccess Clients

To address this issue, Microsoft has released update KB2953212 for Windows 8.x clients that allows the disabling of the NRPT regardless if the client has successfully established a DirectAccess connection. With this update, if a DirectAccess client is located on the corporate network and is unable to reach the NLS, the user will be able to disable the NRPT (effectively disconnect DirectAccess) and once again connect to resources on the corporate network.
Hotfix Available to Disable NRPT on Windows 8.x DirectAccess Clients

This update is certainly no excuse not to deploy your NLS in a highly-available configuration using Windows Network Load Balancing (NLB) or a third-party external load balancer (hardware or software), but it can be a life-saver if your NLS becomes unavailable for any reason. I’d recommend deploying this update to all of your Windows 8.x DirectAccess clients soon.

For more information and to download the hotfix, click here.

Error 0x80040001 When Using OTP on Windows 7 SP1 DirectAccess Clients

Microsoft recently released a hotfix to resolve an issue where Windows 7 SP1 DirectAccess clients fail to connect to a DirectAccess server with the IP-HTTPS IPv6 transition protocol and using One-Time Password (OTP) authentication via the DirectAccess Connectivity Assistant (DCA) 2.0. In this scenario you may receive an HTTP 403 error from the DirectAccess server in response to the certificate signing requests and a 0x80040001 error after entering the OTP.

You can learn more about the hotfix for DCA 2.0 on Windows 7 SP1 and download the associated hotfix here.

TechDays San Francisco 2014

I’m very excited to announce that I’ll be presenting at TechDays in San Francisco on June 5 & 6, 2014! I’ll be delivering a session on cloud and remote access networking in Windows Server 2012 R2. Not only will this session include DirectAccess, but I will also be covering client-based VPN, site-to-site VPN, and the new Web Application Proxy role. If time permits, I might even sneak in some details about Workplace Join and Work Folders. Registration is open now, so sign up soon. Hope to see you there!

TechDays San Francisco 2014

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