Outlook Offline over DirectAccess on Windows 10

Outlook Offline over DirectAccess on Windows 10You may encounter a scenario in which Outlook on Windows 10 reports that it is working offline while connected remotely via DirectAccess. The Network Connectivity Status Indicator (NCSI) shows DirectAccess is in a connected state and all other internal resources are accessible.

Outlook Offline over DirectAccess on Windows 10

This is caused by the default settings of the IP-HTTPS tunnel interface on the DirectAccess server not advertising a default route for connected DirectAccess clients. To resolve this issue, enable default route advertising for IP-HTTPS on each DirectAccess server in the enterprise by running the following PowerShell command.

Get-NetIPInterface | Where-Object {$_.InterfaceAlias -eq “IPHTTPSInterface”} | Set-NetIPInterface -AdvertiseDefaultRoute Enabled -PassThru

Outlook Offline over DirectAccess on Windows 10

In the past I’ve heard reports of this setting being overwritten after group policy refresh. Recent testing on Windows Server 2016 does not show this behavior, however. Please report any results you may have in the comments below. Thanks!

Always On VPN Device Tunnel Configuration Guidance Now Available

Always On VPN Device Tunnel Configuration Guidance Now AvailableWindows 10 Always On VPN hands-on training classes now forming. Details here.

When Always On VPN is configured for Windows 10, the VPN connection is established automatically when the user logs on to their device. This differs fundamentally from DirectAccess, where the connection is established by the machine, before the user logs on. This subtle but important difference has some important ramifications. For example, it means that a user cannot use Always On VPN until they’ve logged on to their device at least once while connected to the corporate network. DirectAccess doesn’t have this limitation, as a connection to an on-premises domain controller is available to authenticate a new user upon first logon.

Device Tunnel Support

To address this shortcoming with Always On VPN, and to provide better feature parity with DirectAccess, Microsoft introduced an update to Windows 10 in the recent Fall Creators update (v1709) that allows for the configuration of a device tunnel for Windows 10 Always On VPN. Once enabled, the device itself can automatically establish a secure remote connection before the user logs on. This enables scenarios such as device provisioning for new remote users without cached credentials. It also enables support for password reset using CTRL+ALT+DEL.

Manage Out

Device tunnel for Windows 10 Always On VPN also enables important manage out scenarios that DirectAccess administrators have come to rely upon. With a device tunnel configured, administrators can initiate connections to remote connected Always On VPN clients to provide remote management and support, without requiring a user to be logged on at the time.

Requirements

To support an Always On VPN device tunnel, the client must be running Windows 10 Enterprise or Education v1709 or later. The computer must be domain-joined and have a machine certificate installed. Device tunnel can only be configured using the built-in Windows 10 VPN client (no support for third-party clients) and the IKEv2 protocol must be used.

Caveat

When configuring a device tunnel, traffic filters can be implemented to restrict communication to only those internal resources required, such as domain controllers, Windows Server Update Services (WSUS) or System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM) servers. However, when traffic filters are used, no inbound traffic to the client is allowed. If manage out is required over the device tunnel, traffic filters cannot be configured. Microsoft expects to remove this limitation in a future update.

Provisioning and Documentation

Configuring and provisioning a Windows 10 Always On VPN device tunnel is similar to the process for the Always On VPN connection itself. A VPN profileXML file is created and then deployed via a Mobile Device Management (MDM) solution such as Microsoft Intune. Optionally, the VPN profileXML can be deployed using SCCM or PowerShell. Additional information about Windows 10 Always On VPN device tunnel configuration, including a sample profileXML and PowerShell script, can be found here.

Additional Resources

Configure a VPN Device Tunnel in Windows 10

Always On VPN and the Future of DirectAccess

5 Things DirectAccess Administrators Should Know about Always On VPN

PowerShell Recommended Reading for DirectAccess and Always On VPN Administrators

PowerShell Recommended Reading for DirectAccess and Always On VPN AdministratorsPowerShell is an important skill for administrators supporting Microsoft workloads including DirectAccess and Always On VPN. Using PowerShell to install required roles and features is much simpler and quicker than using the Graphical User Interface (GUI), with only a single command required to accomplish this task. Some settings aren’t exposed in the GUI and can only be configured using PowerShell. In addition, PowerShell makes the task of troubleshooting DirectAccess and Always On VPN much easier.

Learn PowerShell

One of the best resources for learning PowerShell is the book Learn PowerShell in a Month of Lunches authored by Microsoft MVPs and recognized PowerShell experts Don Jones and Jeff Hicks. This book, now in its third edition, should be considered essential reading for all Microsoft administrators. Click here for more details.

PowerShell Recommended Reading for DirectAccess and Always On VPN Administrators

Learn PowerShell Scripting

Recently Don and Jeff released a new book entitled Learn PowerShell Scripting in a Month of Lunches. This new book builds upon the skills learned in their first title by focusing on the development of PowerShell scripts to automate many common administrative tasks. PowerShell scripts can also be used to build custom, reusable tools to more effectively manage and monitor Microsoft workloads. Click here for more details.

PowerShell Recommended Reading for DirectAccess and Always On VPN Administrators

PowerShell for the Future

In my experience, far too many administrators today lack crucial PowerShell abilities. Don’t get left behind! PowerShell is rapidly becoming a required skill, so get these books and start learning PowerShell today!

Additional Resources

Top 5 DirectAccess Troubleshooting PowerShell Commands

Configure Windows Server Core to use PowerShell by Default

 

5 Things DirectAccess Administrators Should Know About Always On VPN

5 Things DirectAccess Administrators Should Know About Always On VPNWindows 10 Always On VPN hands-on training classes now forming. Details here.

As I’ve written about previously, Microsoft is no longer investing in DirectAccess going forward. There will be no new features or functionality added to the product in the future. Microsoft is now investing in Always On VPN in Windows 10, with new features being released with each semi-annual update of the operating system. But as Microsoft continues to make the push toward Always On VPN over DirectAccess, many administrators have asked about the ramifications of this shift in focus for enterprise remote access. Here are a few points to consider.

It’s the same thing, only different.

Always On VPN provides the same seamless, transparent, always on experience as DirectAccess. Under the covers, the mechanics of how that’s accomplished changes a bit, but fundamentally the user experience is exactly the same. Once a user logs on to their device, a VPN connection is established automatically and the user will have secure remote access to corporate resources.

The connection is still secure.

Where DirectAccess uses IPsec and Connection Security Rules (CSRs) to establish its secure tunnels, Always On VPN uses traditional client-based VPN protocols such as IKEv2, SSTP, L2TP, and PPTP. Both DirectAccess and Always On VPN use certificates for authentication. However, where DirectAccess uses machine certificates to authenticate the computer, Always On VPN leverages user certificates to authenticate the user.

(Note: Machine certificates will be required for Always On VPN when using the optional device tunnel configuration. I will publish more details about this configuration option in a future article.)

Provisioning and managing clients is different.

The administrative experience for Always On VPN is much different than it is with DirectAccess. Where DirectAccess made use of Active Directory and group policy for managing client and server settings, Always On VPN clients must be provisioned using a Mobile Device Management (MDM) solution such as Microsoft Intune, or any third-party MDM platform. Optionally, Always On VPN clients can be provisioned using Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM), or manually using PowerShell.

Security is enhanced.

Always On VPN has the potential to provide much more security and protection than DirectAccess. Always On VPN supports traffic filtering, allowing administrators to restrict remote client communication by IP address, protocol, port, or application. By contrast, DirectAccess allows full access to the internal network after user logon with no native capability to restrict access. In addition, Always On VPN supports integration with Azure Active Directory, which enables conditional access and multifactor authentication scenarios.

It’s built for the future.

Always On VPN also provides support for modern authentication mechanisms like Windows Hello for Business. In addition, Windows Information Protection (WIP) integration is supported to provide essential protection for enterprise data.

Summary

Microsoft set the bar pretty high with DirectAccess. Users love the seamless and transparent access it provides, and administrators reap the benefit of improved systems management for field based devices. Always On VPN provides those same benefits, with additional improvements in security and protection. If you’d like more information about Always On VPN, fill out the form below and I’ll get in touch with you.

Additional Information

Always On VPN and the Future of DirectAccess

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