Always On VPN Error 13806

Troubleshooting Always On VPN Error 691 and 812 – Part 2

As a follow-up to my last post regarding Always On VPN error 13801, this post will cover a similar and related error administrators may encounter, the 13806 error. As mentioned previously, certificate configuration is crucial for Always On VPN deployments. I described some specific certificates requirements for IKEv2 in this earlier post. Following this guidance, administrators should have no issues with IKEv2 Always On VPN connections. However, it is always possible to encounter an error if any of these certificates are missing or misconfigured.

Error 13806

Much like the error 13801 described previously, 13806 is also common. When an Always On VPN connection using IKEv2 fails, the Windows Application event log will record an event ID 20227 from the RasClient source. The error message states the following:

“The user [username] dialed a connection named [connection name] which has failed. The error code returned on failure is 13806”.

IKE Failed To Find Valid Machine Certificate

Error 13806 translates to ERROR_IPSEC_IKE_NO_CERT, indicating IKE failed to find a valid machine certificate. The problem can be on the device, the VPN server, or an issue with the VPN server configuration.

Device Certificate

For the device tunnel, the most obvious cause of this error is a missing device authentication certificate on the client itself. Ensure the endpoint has a valid certificate issued by the organization’s internal PKI that includes Client Authentication EKU (OID 1.3.6.1.5.5.7.3.2). The certificate must have a subject name matching the device’s FQDN. It must also be valid (not expired), trusted, and not revoked.

Certificate Chain

A 13806 error will occur if the device certificate installed on the client is not trusted or if the client does not trust the certificate installed on the VPN server. Ensure the client has all the necessary root and intermediate certification authority (CA) certificates installed in their respective certificate stores.

VPN Server Certificate

A 13806 error can also occur if the VPN server does not have a properly configured server certificate. Ensure the VPN server has a valid certificate issued by the organization’s internal PKI that includes both the Server Authentication (OID 1.3.6.1.5.5.7.3.1) and IP security IKE intermediate (OID 1.3.6.1.5.5.8.2.2) EKUs. The subject name must match the public fully qualified domain name (FQDN) used by VPN clients to connect to the VPN server (not the server’s NetBIOS name). Again, ensure the certificate is valid (not expired), trusted, not revoked, and all necessary root and intermediate CA certificates are installed in their respective certificate stores.

RRAS Configuration

Another cause of the 13806 error for the user tunnel is a misconfigured Routing and Remote Access Service (RRAS) VPN server. An error 13806 can happen if the administrator incorrectly defines a trusted root CA using Set-VpnAuthProtocol. Ensure that the root certificate thumbprint matches exactly the root CA server’s thumbprint used to issue certificates to VPN devices and the VPN server.

Get-VpnAuthProtocol

Root CA Certificate Thumbprint

Resolution

Ensure that devices and VPN servers have correctly configured certificates installed. If the root CA certificate is assigned incorrectly on the VPN server, follow the guidelines detailed here to update the configuration.

Additional Information

Microsoft Windows Always On VPN Error 13801

Microsoft Windows Always On VPN Certificate Requirements for IKEv2

Microsoft Windows Always On VPN IPsec Root Certificate Configuration Issue

Microsoft Windows Always On VPN IKEv2 Policy Mismatch Error

Microsoft Windows Always On VPN IKEv2 Security Configuration

Microsoft Windows Always On VPN IKEv2 Fragmentation

Microsoft Windows Always On VPN IKEv2 Load Balancing and NAT

Microsoft Windows Always On VPN IKEv2 Features and Limitations

Always On VPN Error 13801

Troubleshooting Always On VPN Error 691 and 812 – Part 2

Certificate configuration is crucial for Always On VPN deployments. I described some specific certificates requirements for IKEv2 in this previous post. Following this guidance, administrators should have no issues with IKEv2 Always On VPN connections. However, it is always possible to encounter an error if any of these certificates are missing or misconfigured.

Error 13801

One of the most common errors related to IKEv2 and certificates is 13801. When an Always On VPN connection using IKEv2 fails, the Windows Application event log will record an event ID 20227 from the RasClient source. The error message states the following:

“The user [username] dialed a connection named [connection name] which has failed. The error code returned on failure is 13801”.

IKE Authentication Credentials are Unacceptable

Error 13801 translates to ERROR_IPSEC_IKE_AUTH_FAIL, indicating an authentication failure related to IPsec. The problem can be on the device, the VPN server, or an issue with the VPN server configuration.

Certificate Chain

A 13801 error will occur if the client does not trust the certificate installed on the VPN server. Ensure the client has all the necessary root and intermediate certification authority (CA) certificates installed in their respective certificate stores.

VPN Server Certificate

A 13801 error can also occur if the VPN server does not have a properly configured server certificate. Ensure the VPN server has a valid certificate issued by the organization’s internal PKI that includes both the Server Authentication (OID 1.3.6.1.5.5.7.3.1) and IP security IKE intermediate (OID 1.3.6.1.5.5.8.2.2) EKUs. The subject name must match the public fully qualified domain name (FQDN) used by VPN clients to connect to the VPN server (not the server’s NetBIOS name). Again, ensure the certificate is valid (not expired), trusted, not revoked, and all necessary root and intermediate CA certificates are installed in their respective certificate stores.

RRAS Configuration

Another cause of the 13801 error for the device tunnel is a misconfigured Routing and Remote Access Service (RRAS) VPN server. An error 13801 can happen if the administrator incorrectly defines a trusted root CA using Set-VpnAuthProtocol. Ensure that the root certificate thumbprint matches exactly the root CA server’s thumbprint used to issue certificates to VPN devices and the VPN server.

Get-VpnAuthProtocol

Root CA Certificate Thumbprint

Resolution

Ensure that devices and VPN servers have correctly configured certificates installed. If the root CA certificate is assigned incorrectly on the VPN server, follow the guidelines detailed here to update the configuration.

Additional Information

Microsoft Windows Always On VPN Error 13806 (Coming soon)

Microsoft Windows Always On VPN Certificate Requirements for IKEv2

Microsoft Windows Always On VPN IPsec Root Certificate Configuration Issue

Microsoft Windows Always On VPN IKEv2 Policy Mismatch Error

Microsoft Windows Always On VPN IKEv2 Security Configuration

Microsoft Windows Always On VPN IKEv2 Fragmentation

Microsoft Windows Always On VPN IKEv2 Load Balancing and NAT

Microsoft Windows Always On VPN IKEv2 Features and Limitations

Always On VPN Client Routes Missing

Choosing an Enterprise VPN

When configuring Always On VPN for Windows 10 and Windows 11 clients, administrators may encounter a scenario where an IPv4 route defined in Microsoft Endpoint Manager/Intune or custom XML is not reachable over an established Always On VPN connection. Further investigation indicates the route is added to the configuration on the endpoint but does not appear in the routing table when the connection is active.

Routing Configuration

When split tunneling is enabled, administrators must define routes to IP networks that are reachable over the Always On VPN connection. The method of defining these routes depends on the client configuration deployment method.

Endpoint Manager

Using Microsoft Endpoint Manager, administrators define IP routes in the Split Tunneling section of the configuration settings for the Always On VPN device configuration profile. Routes are defined by entering the destination prefix and prefix size. In this example, the 10.0.0.0/8 and 172.21.12.0/21 IPv4 networks are defined for routing over the Always On VPN tunnel.

Custom XML

Using custom XML deployed using Microsoft Endpoint Manager, System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM), or PowerShell, routes are defined in the XML file using the following syntax.

Client Configuration

Validate the routing configuration has been implemented on the endpoint successfully by running the following PowerShell command.

Get-VpnConnection -Name <Connection Name> | Select-Object -ExpandProperty Routes

As you can see here, the IPv4 routes 10.0.0.0/8 and 172.21.12.0/21 are included in the client’s Always On VPN configuration, as shown below.

Missing Route

However, after establishing an Always On VPN connection, the 172.21.12.0/21 network is not reachable. To continue troubleshooting, run the following PowerShell command to view the active routing table.

Get-NetRoute -AddressFamily IPv4

As you can see above, the only IPv4 route in the VPN configuration added to the routing table is the 10.0.0.0/8 network. The 172.21.12.0/21 IPv4 route is missing.

Network Prefix Definition

IPv4 routes missing from the Always On VPN client’s routing table result from incorrect network prefix definition. Specifically, the IPv4 route 172.21.12.0/21 used in the example here is not a valid network address. Rather, it is a host address in the 172.21.8.0/21 network, as shown below.

The Get-Subnet PowerShell cmdlet is part of the Subnet PowerShell module. To install this module, run the following PowerShell command.

Install-Module Subnet

Resolution

Using the example above, enabling access to the 172.21.12.0/21 subnet would require defining the IPv4 prefix in the routing configuration as 172.21.8.0/21. The moral of this story is always validate routing prefixes to ensure they are, in fact, network addresses and not host addresses.

Additional Information

Always On VPN Routing Configuration

Always On VPN Default Class-based Route and Microsoft Endpoint Manager/Intune

Always On VPN Windows 11 Issues with Intune

Always On VPN RasMan Errors in Windows 10 1903

Since the introduction of Windows 11, there have been numerous reports of issues with Always On VPN when deployed using Microsoft Endpoint Manager/Intune. Specifically, administrators have been reporting that Always On VPN profiles are being deleted, then later reappearing. Obviously, this is highly disruptive to users in the field.

Causes

According to Microsoft, there are several causes for deleted VPN profiles.

Changes to an Existing Profile

Missing Always On VPN profiles commonly occurs when updating settings for an existing VPN profile applied to Windows 11 endpoints. In this scenario, the VPN profile is deleted but not immediately replaced. Synchronize the device with Microsoft Endpoint Manager/Intune once more to return the VPN profile.

Multiple Profiles

Issues with Always On VPN profiles may also occur if two new VPN profiles are applied to the endpoint simultaneously.

Remove and Replace

Removing and replacing an Always On VPN profile at the same time will also result in connectivity issues.

Reference: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/mem/intune/configuration/vpn-settings-configure

Workaround

There is no known workaround for these issues at this time. Microsoft is aware of the problem and is working on a fix, and until then, rolling out Windows 11 with Always On VPN should be avoided.

Additional Issues

There have been reports of other known issues with Windows 11 and Always On VPN. For instance, my PowerShell script that removes an Always On VPN connection doesn’t work with Windows 11. I’m working to resolve that issue as we speak.

Are you experiencing any issues with Always On VPN on Windows 11? Please share them in the comments below!

Always On VPN Book Available for Pre-Order

Great news! My new book, Implementing Always On VPN, is now available for pre-order on Amazon.com. This new book, scheduled for release in late 2021, is a comprehensive implementation guide for Windows 10 Always On VPN. Drawing on many years of experience deploying Always On VPN for organizations worldwide, it covers all aspects of an Always On VPN deployment, including planning and design, prerequisite gathering, infrastructure preparation, and client deployment.

In addition, it contains detailed, prescriptive guidance for advanced configuration options such as application and traffic filtering and proxy server configuration. Cloud deployments using Azure VPN gateway and Virtual WAN are covered, and it includes guidance for configuring Azure MFA and Conditional Access.

Also, the book includes thorough guidance for provisioning certificates using Microsoft Endpoint Manager/Intune using both PKCS and SCEP. It outlines options for high availability for VPN and authentication infrastructure and provides details for ongoing system maintenance and operational support.

Finally, the book has an entire chapter dedicated to troubleshooting and resolving common (and not so common!) issues encountered with Windows 10 Always On VPN.

Reserve your copy today. Pre-order Implementing Always On VPN now!

Chapter List

  1. Always On VPN Overview
  2. Plan an Always On VPN Deployment
  3. Prepare the Infrastructure
  4. Configure Windows Server for Always On VPN
  5. Provision Always On VPN clients
  6. Advanced Configuration
  7. Cloud Deployments
  8. Deploy Certificates with Intune
  9. Integrating Azure MFA
  10. High Availability
  11. Monitor and Report
  12. Troubleshooting

Always On VPN Error 853 on Windows 11

Recently I did some validation testing with Always On VPN on Windows 11, and I’m happy to report that everything seems to work without issue. However, a few readers have reported 853 errors when establishing an Always On VPN connection after upgrading to Windows 11.

Can’t Connect

After upgrading to Windows 11, an Always On VPN connection may fail with the following error message.

“The remote access connection completed, but authentication failed because the certificate that authenticates the client to the server is not valid. Ensure the certificate used for authentication is valid.”

Error 853

In addition, the Application event log records an event ID 20227 from the RasClient source that includes the following message.

“The user <username> dialed a connection name <connection name> which has failed. The error code returned on failure is 853.”

Server Identity

This error will occur when using Protected Extensible Authentication Protocol (PEAP) authentication. Specifically, it can happen when the option to verify NPS server validity by its certificate is selected, and an explicit list of NPS servers is defined, as shown here.

Case Sensitive

In this specific scenario, Windows 11 now appears to be case-sensitive when it compares the NPS server name entered in the NPS configuration to the Subject Name on the certificate returned by the server. For example, if the Subject Name (or Subject Alternative Name, if present) entry on the NPS server certificate is nps.lab.richardhicks.net, using NPS.lab.richardhicks.net will not match and return an 853 error.

Windows 11

Case matching when validating the NPS server certificate is a change in behavior from Windows 10. Before Windows 11, this comparison was case-insensitive, and any combination of case would match if the entire hostname matched. Going forward, it appears Microsoft has also decided to require case matching to validate the server certificate.

Recommendations

Administrators should look carefully at the server certificate issued to the NPS server and ensure their client configuration accurately reflects the hostname in a case-sensitive manner to ensure a smooth migration from Windows 10 to Windows 11.

Additional Information

Troubleshooting Windows 10 Always On VPN Error 853

Windows 10 Always On VPN Network Policy Server (NPS) Load Balancing

Always On VPN Short Name Access Failure

Using Microsoft Endpoint Manager (Intune), administrators can provision Always On VPN to devices that are Azure AD joined only. Users accessing on-premises resources from these devices can still use seamless single sign-on, making this deployment option popular for organizations moving to the cloud.

Short Names

After deploying Always On VPN to Windows 10 devices that are Azure AD joined only and configured to use client certificate authentication, administrators may find that users cannot access on-premises resources by their short name, such as \\app1. The connection fails and returns the following error message.

“Windows can’t find <servername/sharename>. Check the spelling and try again.”

FQDN

Interestingly, on-premises resources are accessible using their fully qualified domain name (FQDN), such as \\app1.corp.example.net.

Troubleshooting

Testing name resolution using the short name works as expected, and the resource is reachable at the network layer, as shown here.

Workaround

This issue is related to how Windows performs authentication when connected via VPN. To resolve this issue, edit the rasphone.pbk file and change the value of UseRasCredentials to 0. Rasphone.pbk can be found in the $env:AppData\Microsoft\Network\Connections\Pbk folder.

After updating this setting, restart the VPN connection for the change to take effect.

Proactive Remediations

While helpful for testing, editing rasphone.pbk manually obviously does not scale well. To address this, consider using Intune Proactive Remediations. Intune Proactive Remediations allows administrators to deploy detection and remediation PowerShell scripts to monitor specific settings and update them if or when they change. Proactive Remediations will ensure the setting is applied consistently across all managed endpoints.

GitHub Repository

I have created a new GitHub repository dedicated to PowerShell scripts for Endpoint Manager Proactive Remediations for Always On VPN. There you will find detection and remediation scripts for the UseRasCredentials settings change described in this article.

Additional Information

Always On VPN Endpoint Manager Proactive Remediation Scripts on GitHub

Endpoint Manager Proactive Remediations Tutorial

Always On VPN Authentication Failure with Azure Conditional Access

Always On VPN Clients Prompted for Authentication when Accessing Internal Resources

Integrating Microsoft Azure Conditional Access with Windows 10 Always On VPN has several important benefits. The most important is that it allows administrators to improve their security posture by enforcing access polices that can be dynamically applied. For example, requiring multifactor authentication (MFA) for privileged users (e.g., administrators) or sign-ins that appear to be risky, the type of device they are connecting with, the health of the endpoint, and much more.

Authentication Failure

When configuring Always On VPN to support Azure Conditional Access, administrators may expeirence a failed authentication during preliminary testing. Specifically, an event ID 20227 from the RasClient source may be encountered with the following error message.

“The user <username> dialed a connection named <connection name> which has failed. The error code returned on failure is 812.”

Looking at the event logs on the Network Policy Server (NPS) server reveals an event ID 6273 from the Microsoft Windows security auditing source with Reason Code 258 and the following Reason.

“The revocation function was unable to check revocation for the certificate.”

Root Cause

When Azure Conditional Access is configured for Always On VPN, a short-lived certificate (1 hour lifetime) is provisioned by Azure. This certificate does not include revocation information because, by design, a short-lived certificate does not need to be revoked. However, by default NPS always checks revocation when client authentication certificates are used for authentication. Since the certificate does not include this information, certificate revocation fails.

Resolution

The way to resolve this issue is to disable certificate revocation checking for Protected Extensible Authentication Protocol (PEAP) authentication requests. To do this, open an elevated PowerShell window on the NPS server and run the following command.

New-ItemProperty -Path ‘HKLM:\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\RasMan\PPP\EAP\13\’ -Name IgnoreNoRevocationCheck -PropertyType DWORD -Value 1 -Force

Once complete, restart the NPS server for the changes to take effect.

Additional Information

Windows 10 Always On VPN Network Policy Server (NPS) Load Balancing

Windows 10 Always On VPN Network Policy Server (NPS) Server 2019 Bug

Troubleshooting Always On VPN Error 853

Troubleshooting Always On VPN Error 691 and 812 – Part 2

Using Windows Server Network Policy Server (NPS) servers is a common choice for authenticating Microsoft Windows 10 Always On VPN user tunnel connections. The NPS server is joined to the domain and configured with a Network Policy that defines the authentication scheme used by clients for authentication when establishing an Always On VPN connection. Protected Extensible Authentication Protocol (PEAP) using client authentication certificates recommended for most Always On VPN deployment scenarios.

Can’t Connect

Users establishing an Always On VPN user tunnel connection using PEAP and client authentication certificates may encounter a scenario in which a VPN connection attempt fails with the following error message.

“The remote access connection completed, but authentication failed because the certificate that authenticates the client to the server is not valid. Ensure that the certificate used for authentication is valid.”

Error 853

In addition, the Application event log records an event ID 20227 from the RasClient source that includes the following error message.

“The user <username> dialed a connection named <connection name> which has failed. The error code is 853.”

Missing NTAuth Certificate

Error code 853 is commonly caused by a missing issuing Certification Authority (CA) certificate in the NTAuth store on the NPS server. The NPS server must have the issuing CA certificate included in this store to perform authentication using client certificates. You can see the contents of the NTAuth certificate store by opening an elevated command window on the NPS server and running the following command.

certutil.exe -enterprise -viewstore NTAuth

Install Certificate

To install the issuing CA server’s certificate into the NTAuth store, copy the CA certificate to the NPS server, open an elevated command window, then run the following command.

certutil.exe -enterprise -addstore NTAuth <issuing CA certificate>

Once complete, view the store again, and you’ll see the issuing CA certificate listed in the NTAuth certificate store.

Additional Information

Troubleshooting Always On VPN Error Code 858

Troubleshooting Always On VPN Error Code 864

Always On VPN and Windows Server 2019 NPS Bug

Always On VPN Network Policy Server (NPS) Load Balancing

Microsoft Network Policy Server (NPS) Reason Codes

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