DirectAccess Manage Out with ISATAP and NLB Clustering

DirectAccess Manage Out with ISATAP and NLB ClusteringDirectAccess connections are bidirectional, allowing administrators to remotely connect to clients and manage them when they are out of the office. DirectAccess clients use IPv6 exclusively, so any communication initiated from the internal network to remote DirectAccess clients must also use IPv6. If IPv6 is not deployed natively on the internal network, the Intrasite Automatic Tunnel Addressing Protocol (ISATAP) IPv6 transition technology can be used to enable manage out.

ISATAP Supportability

According to Microsoft’s support guidelines for DirectAccess, using ISATAP for manage out is only supported for single server deployments. ISATAP is not supported when deployed in a multisite or load-balanced environment.

Not supported” is not the same as “doesn’t work” though. For example, ISATAP can easily be deployed in single site DirectAccess deployments where load balancing is provided using Network Load Balancing (NLB).

ISATAP Configuration

To do this, you must first create DNS A resource records for the internal IPv4 address for each DirectAccess server as well as the internal virtual IP address (VIP) assigned to the cluster.

DirectAccess Manage Out with ISATAP and NLB Clustering

Note: Do NOT use the name ISATAP. This name is included in the DNS query block list on most DNS servers and will not resolve unless it is removed. Removing it is not recommended either, as it will result in ALL IPv6-enabled hosts on the network configuring an ISATAP tunnel adapter.

Once the DNS records have been added, you can configure a single computer for manage out by opening an elevated PowerShell command window and running the following command:

Set-NetIsatapConfiguration -State Enabled -Router [ISATAP FQDN] -PassThru

DirectAccess Manage Out with ISATAP and NLB Clustering

Once complete, an ISATAP tunnel adapter network interface with a unicast IPv6 address will appear in the output of ipconfig.exe, as shown here.

DirectAccess Manage Out with ISATAP and NLB Clustering

Running the Get-NetRoute -AddressFamily IPv6 PowerShell command will show routes to the client IPv6 prefixes assigned to each DirectAccess server.

DirectAccess Manage Out with ISATAP and NLB Clustering

Finally, verify network connectivity from the manage out host to the remote DirectAccess client.

Note: There is a known issue with some versions of Windows 10 and Windows Server 2016 that may prevent manage out using ISATAP from working correctly. There’s a simple workaround, however. More details can be found here.

Group Policy Deployment

If you have more than a few systems on which to enable ISATAP manage out, using Active Directory Group Policy Objects (GPOs) to distribute these settings is a much better idea. You can find guidance for creating GPOs for ISATAP manage out here.

DirectAccess Client Firewall Configuration

Simply enabling ISATAP on a server or workstation isn’t all that’s required to perform remote management on DirectAccess clients. The Windows firewall running on the DirectAccess client computer must also be configured to securely allow remote administration traffic from the internal network. Guidance for configuring the Windows firewall on DirectAccess clients for ISATAP manage out can be found here.

ISATAP Manage Out for Multisite and ELB

The configuration guidance in this post will not work if DirectAccess multisite is enabled or external load balancers (ELB) are used. However, ISATAP can still be used. For more information about enabling ISATAP manage out with external load balancers and/or multisite deployments, fill out the form below and I’ll provide you with more details.

Summary

Once ISATAP is enabled for manage out, administrators on the internal network can remotely manage DirectAccess clients wherever they happen to be. Native Windows remote administration tools such as Remote Desktop, Windows Remote Assistance, and the Computer Management MMC can be used to manage remote DirectAccess clients. In addition, enterprise administration tools such as PowerShell remoting and System Center Configuration Manger (SCCM) Remote Control can also be used. Further, third-party remote administration tools such as VNC, TeamViewer, LogMeIn, GoToMyPC, Bomgar, and many others will also work with DirectAccess ISATAP manage out.

Additional Information

ISATAP Recommendations for DirectAccess Deployments

DirectAccess Manage Out with ISATAP Fails on Windows 10 and Windows Server 2016 

DirectAccess Client Firewall Rule Configuration for ISATAP Manage Out

DirectAccess Manage Out and System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM)

Contact Me

Interested in learning more about ISATAP manage out for multisite and external load balancer deployments? Fill out the form below and I’ll get in touch with you.

Always On VPN Windows 10 Device Tunnel Step-by-Step Configuration using PowerShell

Always On VPN Windows 10 Device Tunnel Step-by-Step Configuration using PowerShellWindows 10 Always On VPN and DirectAccess both provide seamless, transparent, always on remote network access for Windows clients. However, Always On VPN is provisioned to the user, not the machine as it is with DirectAccess. This presents a challenge for deployment scenarios that require the VPN connection to be established before the user logs on. To address this issue, Microsoft introduced support for a device tunnel configuration option beginning with Windows 10 version 1709 (Fall creators update).

Prerequisites

To support an Always On VPN device tunnel, the client computer must be running Windows 10 Enterprise or Education version 1709 (Fall creators update). It must also be domain-joined and have a computer certificate with the Client Authentication Enhanced Key Usage (EKU) issued by the organization’s Public Key Infrastructure (PKI).

Always On VPN Windows 10 Device Tunnel Step-by-Step Configuration using PowerShell

In addition, only the built-in Windows VPN client is supported for Always On VPN device tunnel. Although Windows 10 Always On VPN user connections can be configured using various third-party VPN clients, they are not supported for use with the device tunnel.

VPN ProfileXML

The Always On VPN device tunnel is provisioned using an XML file. You can download a sample VPN ProfileXML file here. Make any changes required for your environment such as VPN server hostnames, routes, traffic filters, and remote address ranges. Optionally include the trusted network detection code, if required. Do not change the protocol type or authentication methods, as these are required.

Always On VPN Windows 10 Device Tunnel Step-by-Step Configuration using PowerShell

Reference: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/remote/remote-access/vpn/vpn-device-tunnel-config#configure-the-vpn-device-tunnel

Once the ProfileXML file is created, it can be deployed using Intune, System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM), or PowerShell. In this post I’ll cover how to configure Windows 10 Always On VPN device tunnel using PowerShell.

Client Configuration

Download the PowerShell script located here and then copy it to the target client computer. The Always On VPN device tunnel must be configured in the context of the local system account. To accomplish this, it will be necessary to use PsExec, one of the PsTools included in the Sysinternals suite of utilities. Download PsExec here, copy it to the target machine, and then run the following command in an elevated PowerShell command window.

PsExec.exe -i -s C:\windows\system32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\powershell.exe

Always On VPN Windows 10 Device Tunnel Step-by-Step Configuration using PowerShell

Another elevated PowerShell window will open, this one now running in the context of the local system account. In this window, navigate to the folder where you copied the PowerShell script and XML file to. Run the PowerShell script and specify the name of the ProfileXML file, as shown below.

VPN_Profile_Device.ps1 -xmlFilePath .\profileXML_device.XML -ProfileName DeviceTunnel

Always On VPN Windows 10 Device Tunnel Step-by-Step Configuration using PowerShell

To verify creation of the VPN device tunnel, run the following PowerShell command.

Get-VpnConnection -AllUserConnection

Always On VPN Windows 10 Device Tunnel Step-by-Step Configuration using PowerShell

Note: Be advised that the ConnectionStatus is always Disconnected. Hopefully this will be addressed by Microsoft in the near future.

Server Configuration

If you are using Windows Server 2012 R2 or Windows Server 2016 Routing and Remote Access Service (RRAS) as your VPN server, you must enable machine certificate authentication for VPN connections and define a root certification authority for which incoming VPN connections will be authenticated with. To do this, open an elevated PowerShell command and run the following commands.

$VPNRootCertAuthority = “Common Name of trusted root certification authority”
$RootCACert = (Get-ChildItem -Path cert:LocalMachine\root | Where-Object {$_.Subject -Like “*$VPNRootCertAuthority*” })
Set-VpnAuthProtocol -UserAuthProtocolAccepted Certificate, EAP -RootCertificateNameToAccept $RootCACert -PassThru

Always On VPN Windows 10 Device Tunnel Step-by-Step Configuration using PowerShell

Summary

Once the Always On VPN device tunnel is configured, the client computer will automatically establish the connection as soon as an active Internet connection is detected. This will enable remote logins for users without cached credentials, and allow administrators to remotely manage Always On VPN clients without requiring a user to be logged on at the time.

Additional Information

Configure Windows 10 VPN Device Tunnel on Microsoft.com

3 Important Advantages of Always On VPN over DirectAccess

5 Things DirectAccess Administrators Should Know About Always On VPN 

Windows 10 Always On VPN and the Future of DirectAccess

Windows 10 Always On VPN Training and Consulting Services

Always On VPN Device Tunnel Configuration Guidance Now Available

Always On VPN Device Tunnel Configuration Guidance Now AvailableWhen Always On VPN is configured for Windows 10, the VPN connection is established automatically when the user logs on to their device. This differs fundamentally from DirectAccess, where the connection is established by the machine, before the user logs on. This subtle but important difference has some important ramifications. For example, it means that a user cannot use Always On VPN until they’ve logged on to their device at least once while connected to the corporate network. DirectAccess doesn’t have this limitation, as a connection to an on-premises domain controller is available to authenticate a new user upon first logon.

Device Tunnel Support

To address this shortcoming with Always On VPN, and to provide better feature parity with DirectAccess, Microsoft introduced an update to Windows 10 in the recent Fall Creators update (v1709) that allows for the configuration of a device tunnel for Windows 10 Always On VPN. Once enabled, the device itself can automatically establish a secure remote connection before the user logs on. This enables scenarios such as device provisioning for new remote users without cached credentials. It also enables support for password reset using CTRL+ALT+DEL.

Manage Out

Device tunnel for Windows 10 Always On VPN also enables important manage out scenarios that DirectAccess administrators have come to rely upon. With a device tunnel configured, administrators can initiate connections to remote connected Always On VPN clients to provide remote management and support, without requiring a user to be logged on at the time.

Requirements

To support an Always On VPN device tunnel, the client must be running Windows 10 Enterprise or Education v1709 or later. The computer must be domain-joined and have a machine certificate installed. Device tunnel can only be configured using the built-in Windows 10 VPN client (no support for third-party clients) and the IKEv2 protocol must be used.

Caveat

When configuring a device tunnel, traffic filters can be implemented to restrict communication to only those internal resources required, such as domain controllers, Windows Server Update Services (WSUS) or System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM) servers. However, when traffic filters are used, no inbound traffic to the client is allowed. If manage out is required over the device tunnel, traffic filters cannot be configured. Microsoft expects to remove this limitation in a future update.

Provisioning and Documentation

Configuring and provisioning a Windows 10 Always On VPN device tunnel is similar to the process for the Always On VPN connection itself. A VPN profileXML file is created and then deployed via a Mobile Device Management (MDM) solution such as Microsoft Intune. Optionally, the VPN profileXML can be deployed using SCCM or PowerShell. Additional information about Windows 10 Always On VPN device tunnel configuration, including a sample profileXML and PowerShell script, can be found here.

Additional Resources

Configure a VPN Device Tunnel in Windows 10

Always On VPN and the Future of DirectAccess

5 Things DirectAccess Administrators Should Know about Always On VPN

DirectAccess Manage Out and System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM)

The seamless and transparent nature of DirectAccess makes it wonderfully easy to use. In most cases, it requires no user interaction at all to access internal corporate resources while away from the office. This enables users to be more productive. At the same time, it offers important connectivity benefits for IT administrators and systems management engineers as well.

Always Managed

DirectAccess Manage Out and System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM)DirectAccess clients are automatically connected to the corporate network any time they have a working Internet connection. Having consistent corporate network connectivity means they receive Active Directory group policy updates on a regular basis, just as on-premises systems do. Importantly, they check in with internal management systems such as System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM) and Windows Server Update Services (WSUS) servers, enabling them to receive updates in a timely manner. Thus, DirectAccess clients are better managed, allowing administrators to more effectively maintain the configuration state and security posture for all their managed systems, including those that are predominantly field-based. This is especially crucial considering the prevalence WannaCry, Cryptolocker, and a variety of other types of ransomware.

DirectAccess Manage Out

DirectAccess Manage Out and System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM)When manage out is configured with DirectAccess, hosts on the internal network can initiate connections outbound to remote connected DirectAccess clients. SCCM Remote Control and Remote Desktop Connection (RDC) are commonly used to remotely connect to systems for troubleshooting and support. With DirectAccess manage out enabled, these and other popular administrative tools such as VNC, Windows Remote Assistance, and PowerShell remoting can also be used to manage remote DirectAccess clients in the field. In addition, enabling manage out allows for the proactive installation of agents and other software on remote clients, such as the SCCM and System Center Operation Manager (SCOM) agents, third-party management agents, antivirus and antimalware software, and more. A user does not have to be logged on to their machine for manage out to work.

IPv6

DirectAccess manage out requires that connections initiated by machines on the internal network to remote-connected DirectAccess clients must be made using IPv6. This is because DirectAccess clients use IPv6 exclusively to connect to the DirectAccess server. To enable connectivity over the public IPv4 Internet, clients use IPv6 transition technologies (6to4, Teredo, IP-HTTPS), and IPv6 translation components on the server (DNS64 and NAT64) enable clients to communicate with internal IPv4 resources. However, DNS64 and NAT64 only translate IPv6 to IPv4 inbound. They do not work in reverse.

Native or Transition?

It is recommended that IPv6 be deployed on the internal network to enable DirectAccess manage out. This is not a trivial task, and many organizations can’t justify the deployment for just this one specific use case. As an alternative, IPv6 can be configured with an IPv6 transition technology, specifically the Intrasite Automatic Tunnel Addressing Protocol (ISATAP). ISATAP functions as an IPv6 overlay network, allowing internal hosts to obtain IPv6 addresses and routing information from an ISATAP router to support manage out for DirectAccess clients.

ISATAP

When DirectAccess is installed, the server is automatically configured as an ISATAP router. Guidance for configuring ISATAP clients can be found here. Using ISATAP can be an effective approach to enabling DirectAccess manage out for SCCM when native IPv6 is not available, but it is not without its drawbacks.

• Using the DirectAccess server for ISATAP is only supported with single server DirectAccess deployments.
• Using the DirectAccess server for ISATAP does work when using Network Load Balancing (NLB) with some additional configuration, but it is not supported.
• Using the DirectAccess server for ISATAP does not work when an external load balancer is used, or if multisite is enabled.

ISATAP with Load Balancing and Multisite

It is technically possible to enable DirectAccess manage out for SCCM using ISATAP in load-balanced and multisite DirectAccess deployments, however. It involves deploying a separate ISATAP router and some custom configuration, but once in place it works perfectly. I offer this service to my customers as part of a consulting engagement. If you’re interested in restoring DirectAccess manage out functionality to support SCCM remote control, RDC, or VNC in load-balanced or multisite DirectAccess deployments, fill out the form below and I’ll provide you with more information.

Additional Resources

ISATAP Recommendations for DirectAccess Deployments
DirectAccess Manage Out with ISATAP Fails on Windows 10 and Windows Server 2016
DirectAccess Client Firewall Rule Configuration for ISATAP Manage Out
Video: Windows 10 DirectAccess in action (includes manage out demonstration)

Managing and Supporting DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016 Video Training Course on Pluralsight

Planning and Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016I’m pleased to announce my newest video training course, Managing and Supporting DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016, is now available on Pluralsight! This new course is a follow-up to my previous course, Planning and Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016. This latest course builds upon the first one and covers advanced configuration such as enabling load balancing, configuring geographic redundancy, and enforcing strong user authentication using one-time passwords (OTP) and smart cards.

In addition, monitoring and reporting is covered, as well as implementing manage out for DirectAccess clients in supported scenarios. The course also includes a full hour of in-depth DirectAccess configuration and connectivity troubleshooting that will be valuable for all DirectAccess administrators.

The course includes the following training modules:

Configuring High Availability
Enabling Strong User Authentication
DirectAccess Monitoring and Reporting
Implementing Outbound Management for DirectAccess Clients
DirectAccess Troubleshooting

Throughout the course, I share valuable knowledge and insight gained from more than 5 years of experience deploying DirectAccess for some of the largest organizations in the world. Pluralsight offers a free trial subscription if you don’t already have one, so watch my latest DirectAccess video training course today!

Additional Resources

Planning and Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016 on Pluralsight
Managing and Supporting DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016 on Pluralsight
Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016 book

DirectAccess Manage Out with ISATAP Fails on Windows 10 and Windows Server 2016

Note: The issue described in this article has been resolved in Windows 10 version 1703 (Creators Update). Making these changes is no longer required after installing the Creators Update release of Windows 10.

Introduction

For organizations that have implemented DirectAccess manage out using the Intrasite Automatic Tunnel Addressing Protocol (ISATAP), you may find connecting to remote DirectAccess clients by hostname using Windows 10 or Windows Server 2016 fails. Connections to remote DirectAccess clients using Windows 7, Windows 8.x, Windows Server 2008/2008R2, and Windows Server 2012/2012R2 work without issue.

Troubleshooting

On a Windows 10 or Windows Server 2016 host configured to use ISATAP for DirectAccess manage out, the remote DirectAccess client resolves to an IPv6 address correctly.

DirectAccess Manage Out with ISATAP Fails on Windows 10 and Windows Server 2016

In addition, a route to the DirectAccess client’s IPv6 prefix is also present in the routing table.

DirectAccess Manage Out with ISATAP Fails on Windows 10 and Windows Server 2016

Nevertheless, attempts to connect to the remote DirectAccess client by name fail.

DirectAccess Manage Out with ISATAP Fails on Windows 10 and Windows Server 2016

The DirectAccess client is reachable by its IPv6 address, however.

DirectAccess Manage Out with ISATAP Fails on Windows 10 and Windows Server 2016

Known Issue

There is a known issue with Windows 10 and Windows Server 2016 DNS client that prevents manage out using ISATAP on these operating systems from working correctly. A while back I wrote about implementing some registry entries as a workaround for this issue on Windows 10. Recently, Karsten Hentrup brought another effective workaround to my attention that also involves adding a registry entry on the ISATAP client machine. This method is preferred as it requires only one registry entry and does not adversely affect existing DNS operation. To make this change, on each machine that requires DirectAccess manage out functionality open an elevated PowerShell command window and run the following command.

New-ItemProperty -Path “HKLM:\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Dnscache\Parameters\” -Name AddrConfigControl -PropertyType DWORD -Value 0 -Force

Summary

When using ISATAP, ensure that this workaround is implemented on any Windows 10 or Windows Server 2016 machine that will require manage out functionality to remote DirectAccess clients.

Additional Resources

ISATAP Recommendations for DirectAccess Deployments

DirectAccess Client Firewall Rule Configuration for ISATAP Manage Out

Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2012 R2 Book

DirectAccess Consulting Services

ISATAP Recommendations for DirectAccess Deployments

ISATAP Recommendations for DirectAccess DeploymentsFrom a client perspective, DirectAccess is an IPv6 only solution. The client communicates with the DirectAccess server and intranet resources using IPv6 exclusively. To enable communication between DirectAccess clients and IPv4 only resources on the internal network, the DirectAccess servers uses two important protocol translatorsDNS64 and NAT64. Unfortunately DNS64 and NAT64 provide only inbound protocol translation, so another measure is required for communication initiated outbound to connected DirectAccess clients.

ISATAP

To support outbound communication originating from the Intranet to connect DirectAccess clients, the DirectAccess server is configured as an Intra-Site Automatic Tunnel Addressing Protocol (ISATAP) router. ISATAP is an IPv6 transition technology that allows hosts on the intranet to initiate outbound communication to DirectAccess clients on the Internet by tunneling IPv6 communication over the internal IPv4 network.

ISATAP can be enabled by populating internal DNS with a host record called ISATAP that resolves to the IPv4 address assigned to the Internal network adapter on the ISATAP router, in this case the DirectAccess server (don’t forget to remove ISATAP from the DNS global query block list!). When a client resolves ISATAP to an IP address successfully, it enables an ISATAP tunnel adapter and assigns itself an ISATAP IPv6 address. Once enabled, any host with an ISATAP tunnel adapter configured can initiate outbound communication to DirectAccess clients on the Internet.

Important note: It is not recommended to deploy ISATAP globally via DNS. See below for more details.

When configured and enabled, ISATAP opens up new and interesting network communication scenarios. For example, a helpdesk administrator can proactively initiate a remote desktop session to a remote client connected via DirectAccess to troubleshoot an application. Systems management engineers can push software out to DirectAccess clients without requiring an agent on the remote client to “phone home” to receive software updates. This model is often referred to as “manage out”.

Limitations

In the early days of DirectAccess with Windows Server 2008 R2 and Forefront UAG, configuring and enabling ISATAP as described above was standard operating procedure. However, we soon learned that there are some serious drawbacks to deploying ISATAP. While the DirectAccess manage out scenario is an important and frequently requested feature of a DirectAccess implementation, it often causes more trouble than it solves. In its default configuration, ISATAP is a global change that affects all hosts that can resolve the hostname ISATAP to an IP address. The challenge here is that this change can break or impair normal network communication for some hosts on the Intranet. For example, if an internal host is able to resolve a public hostname to an IPv6 address, it may attempt to connect to the site via ISATAP.

Unfortunately, in this scenario ISATAP does not lead to the public Internet. Rather, ISATAP is used to provide network connectivity exclusively for our DirectAccess clients. Since IPv6 is preferred in most modern operating system’s networking stacks, it can lead to failed or seriously delayed communication to Internet resources. In addition, once ISATAP is enabled globally there will be a lot of IPv6 communication taking place on the network, which in large enterprise networks can be a source of confusion for those individuals with the responsibility for monitoring the network.

ISATAP also suffers from a lack of robust monitoring tools for this very essential service. Additionally, ISATAP turns the OSI model upside down. ISATAP relies on upper-layer protocols (DNS) to provide its service. If there are issues with DNS that prevent proper name resolution, ISATAP routing will cease to function, which is fundamentally backward.

Targeted Deployment

ISATAP Recommendations for DirectAccess DeploymentsAs I mentioned earlier, ISATAP is a global setting by default. However, in most environments there will only be a few systems that will require the ability to initiate outbound communication from the internal network to remote DirectAccess clients. Typically these will be helpdesk administrators’ workstations or management systems. Today we are recommending that you deploy IPv6 on any internal systems that will participate in any DirectAccess manage out scenarios. Unfortunately this will not be possible in many cases, as additional network changes are often required to support IPv6 on the Intranet. In these cases we recommend that instead of configuring ISATAP in DNS globally, you target individual systems for ISATAP configuration as required. This can be accomplished in a number of ways.

Group Policy

This is recommended way to deploy ISATAP settings to systems that require DirectAccess manage out functionality. It is the easiest to manage and the most scalable as well. A unique ISATAP hostname (for example, DirectAccess-ISATAP) is created in the internal DNS that resolves to the internal IPv4 address of the DirectAccess server. Create a new GPO in Active Directory to assign it to management workstations using security group filtering or OU targeting. Edit the GPO setting Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > Network > TCPIP Settings > IPv6 Transition Technologies > Set ISATAP State (Enabled and set to Enabled State) and > Set ISATAP Router Name (Enabled and enter the ISATAP hostname created previously).

ISATAP Recommendations for DirectAccess Deployments

PowerShell

Using PowerShell is an alternative method of configuring an individual system to use ISATAP. Although not as scalable as the group policy method, it is still very effective. On the system that requires network connectivity to DirectAccess clients, open an elevated PowerShell command window and run the following command:

Set-NetISATAPConfiguration -Router <NameOrIPAddress>

Netsh

Another command line method for configuring the ISATAP is to use netsh.exe. In an elevated command prompt window run the following command:

netsh interface isatap set router <NameOrIPAddress>

HOSTS File

This is the least desirable way to configure ISATAP, but I’ll mention it here because it is quick and simple and does work. On any system that requires ISATAP for DirectAccess manage out, simply edit the HOSTS file in C:\Windows\System32\Drivers\Etc and add a host record for ISATAP that resolves to the IPv4 address assigned to the internal network interface of the DirectAccess server. Obviously this is the least scalable alternative and should only be used in test environments or very small production networks.

Supportability

ISATAP is only supported for single server DirectAccess deployments. ISATAP will work when Network Load Balancing (NLB) is enabled, but it requires some additional configuration. ISATAP does not work when an external load balancer is in use and/or multisite is enabled. To restore manage out functionality for DirectAccess for load-balanced and multisite deployments, additional infrastructure and configuration is required. Fill out the form below to request more information.

Summary

As you can see there are numerous drawbacks to configuring ISATAP on a global scale. Fortunately there are simple and effective workarounds that allow you to target specific systems for ISATAP configuration. Choose the one that works best for you and have fun managing your DirectAccess clients!

Additional Information

DirectAccess Manage Out and Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM)

DirectAccess Client Firewall Rule Configuration for ISATAP Manage Out

DirectAccess Manage Out with ISATAP Fails on Windows 10 and Windows Server 2016

Contact Me!

Want to enable DirectAccess manage out for System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM) remote control or Remote Desktop Connection (RDC) in load-balanced and multisite deployments? Fill out the form below for more information.

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