Top 5 DirectAccess Troubleshooting PowerShell Commands

Top 5 DirectAccess Troubleshooting PowerShell CommandsNative PowerShell commands in Windows 10 make DirectAccess troubleshooting much easier than older operating systems like Windows 7. For example, with one PowerShell command an administrator can quickly determine if a DirectAccess client has received the DirectAccess client settings policy. In addition, PowerShell can be used to view the status of the connection and retrieve additional information or error codes that can be helpful for determining the cause of a failed connection. Further, PowerShell can also be used to review configuration details and perform other troubleshooting and connectivity validation tasks.

Here are my top 5 PowerShell commands for troubleshooting DirectAccess on Windows 10.

1. Get-DAClientExperienceConfiguration

Ensuring that the DirectAccess Client Settings group policy has been applied to the client is one of the first steps in troubleshooting failed DirectAccess connections. While it is possible to use gpresult to do this, using the Get-DAClientExperienceConfiguration PowerShell command is much simpler. If DirectAccess client settings have been applied, the output of the command will include information such as the IPsec tunnel endpoint IPv6 addresses and the Network Connectivity Assistant (NCA) corporate resource URL. If DirectAccess client settings have not been applied, this information will be missing.

Top 5 DirectAccess Troubleshooting PowerShell Commands

Figure 1. DirectAccess Client Settings group policy successfully applied.

Top 5 DirectAccess Troubleshooting PowerShell Commands

Figure 2. DirectAccess Client Settings group policy not applied.

2. Get-NetIPHttpsState

Performance improvements first introduced in Windows 8 have made IP-HTTPS the IPv6 transition technology of choice when it comes to supporting DirectAccess client connectivity. Also, if the DirectAccess server is located behind an edge device performing Network Address Translation (NAT), IP-HTTPS is the only supported transition technology. Using the Get-NetIPHttpsState PowerShell command, the DirectAccess administrator can quickly determine if the IP-HTTPS connection was successful. If it was not, the command will return an error code and interface status that will indicate why the IP-HTTPS connection was unsuccessful.

Top 5 DirectAccess Troubleshooting PowerShell Commands

Figure 3. Get-NetIPHttpsState

3. Get-NetIPHttpsConfiguration

When troubleshooting IP-HTTPS connection failures, it is necessary to obtain additional information to continue the troubleshooting process. Using the Get-NetIPHttpsConfiguration PowerShell command, the DirectAccess administrator can obtain the public hostname for the DirectAccess server and ensure that the name resolves to the correct IP address in DNS and that it is reachable on TCP port 443.

Top 5 DirectAccess Troubleshooting PowerShell Commands

Figure 4. Get-NetIPHttpsConfiguration

4. Resolve-DnsName

Using the Resolve-DnsName PowerShell command is crucial when performing any name resolution tasks on the DirectAccess client. This is because Resolve-DnsName is aware of the Name Resolution Policy Table (NRPT) and will direct name resolution requests accordingly. Tools like nslookup are DNS server testing tools and are unaware of the NRPT. Typically they do not yield expected results when testing name resolution on a DirectAccess client.

Top 5 DirectAccess Troubleshooting PowerShell Commands

Figure 5. Name resolution results from Resolve-DnsName and nslookup.

5. Get-DnsClientNrptPolicy

Often the cause of DirectAccess client connectivity issues is a misconfigured NRPT. Using the Get-DnsClientNrptPolicy PowerShell command the DirectAccess administrator can validate that name resolution requests for host names in any internal namespaces are being sent to the DirectAccess DNS64 IPv6 address.

Top 5 DirectAccess Troubleshooting PowerShell Commands

Figure 6. Get-DnsClientNrptPolicy

Additional Resources

Top 5 DirectAccess Troubleshooting Tips

Troubleshooting Name Resolution Issues on DirectAccess Clients

Learn PowerShell in a Month of Lunches Book by Don Jones and Jeff Hicks

Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016 Book

Planning and Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016 Video Training Course

Managing and Supporting DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016 Video Training Course

 

 

DirectAccess Reporting Fails and Schannel Event ID 36871 after Disabling TLS 1.0

IMPORTANT NOTE: The guidance in this post will disable support for null SSL/TLS cipher suites on the DirectAccess server. This will result in reduced scalability and performance for all clients, including Windows 8.x and Windows 10. It is recommended that TLS 1.0 not be disabled on the DirectAccess server if at all possible.

When performing security hardening on the DirectAccess server it is not uncommon to disable weak cipher suites or insecure protocols such as SSL 3.0 and TLS 1.0. However, after disabling SSL 3.0 and TLS 1.0 you will find that it is no longer possible generate reports. Clicking the Generate Report link in the Remote Access Management console returns no data.

DirectAccess Reporting Fails after Disabling TLS 1.0

In addition, the System event log indicates Schannel errors with Event ID 36871. The error message states that “A fatal error occurred while creating a TLS client credential. The internal error state is 10013.”

DirectAccess Reporting Fails after Disabling TLS 1.0

To resolve this issue and restore DirectAccess reporting functionality you must enable the use of FIPS compliant encryption algorithms on the DirectAccess server. This change can be made locally or via Active Directory group policy. Open the Group Policy Management Console (gpmc.msc) for Active Directory GPO, or the Local Group Policy Editor (gpedit.msc) on the DirectAccess server and navigate to Computer Configuration > Windows Settings > Security Settings > Local Policies > Security Options. Double-click System cryptography: Use FIPS compliant algorithms for encryption, hashing, and signing and select Enabled.

DirectAccess Reporting Fails after Disabling TLS 1.0

If using Active Directory GPO, ensure that the GPO is applied all DirectAccess servers in the organization. A restart is not required for this setting to take effect. Once this change has been made, reporting should work as expected.

Additional Resources

DirectAccess IP-HTTPS SSL and TLS Insecure Cipher Suites
DirectAccess Video Training Courses on Pluralsight
Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016 Book on Amazon.com

Managing and Supporting DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016 Video Training Course on Pluralsight

Planning and Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016I’m pleased to announce my newest video training course, Managing and Supporting DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016, is now available on Pluralsight! This new course is a follow-up to my previous course, Planning and Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016. This latest course builds upon the first one and covers advanced configuration such as enabling load balancing, configuring geographic redundancy, and enforcing strong user authentication using one-time passwords (OTP) and smart cards.

In addition, monitoring and reporting is covered, as well as implementing manage out for DirectAccess clients in supported scenarios. The course also includes a full hour of in-depth DirectAccess configuration and connectivity troubleshooting that will be valuable for all DirectAccess administrators.

The course includes the following training modules:

Configuring High Availability
Enabling Strong User Authentication
DirectAccess Monitoring and Reporting
Implementing Outbound Management for DirectAccess Clients
DirectAccess Troubleshooting

Throughout the course, I share valuable knowledge and insight gained from more than 5 years of experience deploying DirectAccess for some of the largest organizations in the world. Pluralsight offers a free trial subscription if you don’t already have one, so watch my latest DirectAccess video training course today!

Additional Resources

Planning and Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016 on Pluralsight
Managing and Supporting DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016 on Pluralsight
Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016 book

Top 5 DirectAccess Troubleshooting Tips

Top 5 DirectAccess Troubleshooting TipsDirectAccess is a thing of beauty when everything is working as it should. When it isn’t, troubleshooting can be quite challenging. DirectAccess relies on many Windows platform technologies such as Active Directory for authentication, PKI for certificate management, group policy for settings deployment, IPsec for encryption, and IPv6 for transport. With so many dependencies, locating the source of the problem can be a difficult and daunting task.

I’m frequently called upon to help organizations of all sizes with DirectAccess troubleshooting. While this post is not intended to be a detailed, prescriptive guide for DirectAccess troubleshooting, I did want to share some common troubleshooting tips based on many years of troubleshooting DirectAccess.

Here are my top 5 DirectAccess troubleshooting tips:

  1. Check Prerequisites – Before diving in and collecting network traces and scouring event logs for clues as to why DirectAccess isn’t working, it’s essential to start at the beginning. Often the source of trouble is missing or misconfigured prerequisites. For example, is the DirectAccess client running a supported operating system? Remember, clients must be running Windows 10 Enterprise or Education, Windows 8.x Enterprise, or Windows 7 Enterprise or Ultimate. Also, ensure that the Windows firewall is enabled on DirectAccess servers and clients, that certificates are installed and valid (trusted, correct EKU, etc.), and that the DirectAccess settings GPO has been applied to servers and clients.
  2. Validate External Connectivity – If you are following implementation and security best practices for DirectAccess, the DirectAccess server will be in a perimeter/DMZ network behind an edge firewall. The firewall must be configured to allow inbound TCP port 443 only. If the firewall is also performing Network Address Translation (NAT), the NAT rule must be configured to forward traffic to the DirectAccess server’s dedicated or virtual IP address (VIP), or the VIP of the load balancer. Watch for routing issues when using load balancers too. It’s a good idea to confirm external connectivity using the Test-NetConnection PowerShell command. Even better, use the open source tool Nmap for more thorough testing.
  3. Remove Third Party Software – I can’t tell you how many times I’ve resolved DirectAccess connectivity issues by removing (not just disabling!) third party software on the client and/or server. It’s not uncommon for third-party security software to interfere with IPsec and/or IPv6 communication, both of which are vital to DirectAccess. If your DirectAccess troubleshooting efforts reveal no underlying issues with prerequisites or external connectivity, I’d suggest removing (at least temporarily) any third-party software and testing again.
  4. Isolate Environmental Issues – Occasionally other settings applied manually or via Active Directory group policy will interfere with DirectAccess. Examples include IPv6 being disabled in the registry, IPv6 transition technologies required to support DirectAccess are turned off, essential firewall rules for DirectAccess are disabled, or manipulating local security settings such as Access this computer from the network. To assist with troubleshooting it might be necessary to temporarily place DirectAccess clients and servers in their own dedicated Organizational Units (OUs) and block inheritance to isolate the configuration as much as possible. In addition, if DirectAccess clients are servers are provisioned using images or templates, testing with a clean build straight from the installation source (ISO or DVD) can be helpful.
  5. Check for Unsupported Configurations – If DirectAccess isn’t working, it might be possible the configuration you are trying to use is not supported. Examples including strong user authentication with OTP when force tunneling is enabled, provisioning Windows 7 clients when using Kerberos Proxy authentication, or provisioning Windows 10 clients when Network Access Protection (NAP) integration is enabled. These configurations won’t work and are formally documented here.

This is by no means a comprehensive or exhaustive troubleshooting guide. For more information and additional DirectAccess troubleshooting guidance I would encourage you to purchase my book Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016, which has an entire chapter devoted just to troubleshooting. In addition, watch my DirectAccess video training courses on Pluralsight for details and information about DirectAccess installation, configuration, management, support, and troubleshooting. And if you’re still struggling to resolve a DirectAccess problem, use the form at the bottom of this page to contact me to inquire about additional troubleshooting help.

Additional Resources

Microsoft Windows DirectAccess Client Troubleshooting Tool
DirectAccess and Windows 10 Professional
DirectAccess Troubleshooting with Nmap
DirectAccess Unsupported Configurations
Planning and Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016 Video Training Course on Pluralsight
Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016 Book

Need assistance with DirectAccess troubleshooting? Complete the form below and I’ll get in touch with you.

KEMP LoadMaster Load Balancer Certificate Format Invalid

When implementing a KEMP LoadMaster load balancer, one of the first configuration tasks performed is importing root and intermediate Certification Authority (CA) certificates. When doing this, it is not uncommon to encounter the following error message.

Certificate Format Invalid.

KEMP LoadMaster Load Balancer Certificate Invalid

To resolve this issue, .CER files must first be converted to .PEM format before being imported in to the LoadMaster. Using OpenSSL, .CER files can quickly be converted to .PEM with the following command.

openssl x509 -inform der -in example.cer -out example.pem

Optionally, .CER files can be converted to .PEM online here.

If the root and/or intermediate certificates are from an internal PKI, export the certificates using the Base-64 encoded x.509 (.CER) option. Certificates exported using this format can be imported directly in to the LoadMaster without first having to be converted to .PEM.

KEMP LoadMaster Load Balancer Certificate Format Invalid

Pro tip: When entering the Certificate Name, it is not necessary to enter a file extension. The name will be appended with .PEM automatically upon import.

KEMP LoadMaster Load Balancer Certificate Format Invalid

KEMP LoadMaster Load Balancer Certificate Format Invalid

Additional Resources

DirectAccess Deployment Guide for KEMP LoadMaster Load Balancers

Maximize Your Investment in Windows 10 with KEMP LoadMaster Load Balancers

DirectAccess and the FREE KEMP LoadMaster Load Balancer

Configure KEMP LoadMaster Load Balancer for DirectAccess Network Location Server (NLS)

Planning and Implementing DirectAccess Video Training Course on Pluralsight

Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016 Book

DirectAccess Network Connectivity Assistant Missing in Windows 10

Occasionally when troubleshooting DirectAccess connectivity issues I will encounter a scenario in which a client will have an established DirectAccess connection, but DirectAccess does not appear in the Network & Internet settings window in the user interface.

Windows 10 DirectAccess Network Connectivity Assistant Missing

In addition, the Get-DAConnectionStatus PowerShell command returns the following error.

Network Connectivity Assistant service is stopped or not responding.

Windows 10 DirectAccess Network Connectivity Assistant Missing

This commonly occurs when the Network Connectivity Assistant service (NcaSvc) fails to start. The issue can be easily resolve by simply starting the NCA service using the following PowerShell command.

Start-Service NcaSvc

Once the service has been started, DirectAccess will appear in the Network & Internet settings window.

Windows 10 DirectAccess Network Connectivity Assistant Missing

Additional Resources

Planning and Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016 on Pluralsight

Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016 Book

DirectAccess Consulting Services

DirectAccess Troubleshooting with Nmap

DirectAccess IP-HTTPS Discovery Script for NmapDirectAccess troubleshooting can be made much easier using open source tools such as Nmap. Nmap can be used to perform many essential network connectivity and configuration checks, including validating network paths, confirming DirectAccess server response, and viewing SSL configuration. Nmap can also be used to ensure that the attack surface of the DirectAccess server is properly minimized. Some tests can be performed using only native Nmap functionality, while others require the use of specialized Nmap scripts that are included with the tool.

Installation

Nmap can be installed on a wide variety of operating systems, including Windows. If you plan to install Nmap on Windows, be sure to also install WinPcap and the Microsoft Visual C++ 2013 Redistributable. The Visual C++ component is included with the Nmap download. WinPcap must be downloaded separately here.

Testing External Connectivity

Validating external connectivity is often one of the first DirectAccess troubleshooting steps I take. Confirm that the DirectAccess public hostname resolves to the correct IP address, then run the following Nmap command to validate network connectivity from the Internet to the DirectAccess server.

nmap -n -Pn -p443 <da_public_hostname>

DirectAccess Troubleshooting with Nmap

If the hostname resolves correctly and the network path is complete, the server should respond and Nmap will show the port as open. However, this doesn’t necessarily mean that the DirectAccess server is the device that replied! Due to misconfiguration, it is possible that another server or network device listening on TCP port 443 responded, so this is not a conclusive test.

DirectAccess Server Response

To confirm the DirectAccess server is responding to HTTPS requests and not some other server or device, run the following Nmap command with the ip-https-discover script.

nmap -n -Pn -p443 <da_public_hostname> –script ip-https-discover

If the DirectAccess server responds to the request, Nmap will return the following message:

IP-HTTPS is supported. This indicates that this host supports Microsoft DirectAccess.

DirectAccess Troubleshooting with Nmap

If the port is open but the script does not return this message, it is likely that another server or device is responding on TCP port 443, not the DirectAccess server.

Note: If an Application Delivery Controller (ADC) is configured to perform IP-HTTPS preauthentication, the Nmap IP-HTTPS discovery script will not return this result. This is expected and by design.

SSL Certificate Validation

It is not uncommon for DirectAccess clients to fail to connect via IP-HTTPS because of SSL certificate issues. Specifically, an SSL certificate that is not trusted, is expired, or its subject field does not match the public hostname will prevent DirectAccess clients from connecting. To view the SSL certificate configuration of a DirectAccess server, run the following Nmap command with the ssl-cert script.

nmap -n -Pn -p443 <da_public_hostname> –script ssl-cert

DirectAccess Troubleshooting with Nmap

SSL Cipher Suite Configuration

Occasionally there can be issues with the SSL configuration on the DirectAccess server that prevent some clients from connecting, or result in poor performance. This commonly occurs when administrators perform SSL hardening on the DirectAccess server and remove support for null cipher suites. Null cipher suites should never be disabled on the DirectAccess server. They are important to ensure the highest levels of performance for Windows 8.x and Windows 10 clients. Also, if an Application Delivery Controller (ADC) or load balancer is performing SSL offload, lack of support for null cipher suites will prevent Windows 8.x and Windows 10 clients from connecting. To determine if the DirectAccess server supports null cipher suites, run the following Nmap command with the ssl-enum-ciphers script.

nmap -n -Pn -p443 <da_public_hostname> –script ssl-enum-ciphers

DirectAccess Troubleshooting with Nmap

Attack Surface Audit

If DirectAccess implementation and security best practices are followed, the DirectAccess server will be behind an edge firewall. The only port required to be allowed inbound for DirectAccess is TCP port 443. It is recommended that a full port scan be performed against the DirectAccess server’s public IPv4 address to identify any unnecessary ports that may be open externally. To perform a full port scan, run the following Nmap command.

nmap -n -Pn -p- <da_public_hostname>

Ideally it should look like this.

DirectAccess Troubleshooting with Nmap

If it looks something like this, you’re in serious trouble!

DirectAccess Troubleshooting with Nmap

The DirectAccess server should never be listening for requests other that HTTPS on the public Internet. Exposing services such as SMB (TCP port 445), RDP (TCP port 3389), and others presents a significant security risk. It is recommended that edge firewalls be configured to allow inbound TCP port 443 only. If the DirectAccess server is connected directly to the public Internet (not recommended!) then the Windows Firewall should be configured to restrict access to inbound TCP port 443 only.

Additional Resources

DirectAccess IP-HTTPS Discovery Script for Nmap
Planning and Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016 on Pluralsight
Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016 Book
DirectAccess Troubleshooting and Consulting Services

Planning and Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016 Video Training Course on Pluralsight

Planning and Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016I’m excited to announce my latest video training course, Planning and Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016, is now available on Pluralsight! In this course, I’ll provide a high-level overview of DirectAccess, compare it with VPN, and outline supporting infrastructure requirements. In addition, you’ll learn how to choose the best network topology for a DirectAccess deployment, how to prepare Active Directory and Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) for DirectAccess, and how to install and configure DirectAccess in Windows Server 2016 using the latest implementation and security best practices. You’ll also learn how to provision Windows 10 clients and understand the unique requirements for supporting Windows 7.

The course includes the following training modules:

Overview of DirectAccess
Planning for DirectAccess
Configuring DirectAccess with the Getting Started Wizard
Configuring DirectAccess with the Remote Access Setup Wizard
Provisioning DirectAccess Clients
Supporting Windows 7 Clients

Throughout the course, I share valuable knowledge and insight gained from more than 5 years of experience deploying DirectAccess for some of the largest organizations in the world. Pluralsight offers a free trial subscription if you don’t already have one, so watch my DirectAccess video training course today!

Additional Resources

Planning and Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016 on Pluralsight
Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016

Troubleshooting DirectAccess IP-HTTPS Error Code 0x800b0109

A Windows 7 or Windows 8.x/10 client may fail to establish a DirectAccess connection using the IP-HTTPS IPv6transition technology. When troubleshooting this issue, running ipconfig.exe show that the media state for the tunnel adapter iphttpsinterface is Media disconnected.

Troubleshooting DirectAccess IP-HTTPS Error 0x80090326

Running the Get-NetIPHttpsState PowerShell command on Windows 8.x/10 clients or the netsh interface httpstunnel show interface command on Windows 7 clients returns an error code of 0x800b0109 with an interface status Failed to connect to the IPHTTPS server; waiting to reconnect.

Troubleshooting DirectAccess IP-HTTPS Error 0x80090326

Error code 0x800b0109 translates to CERT_E_UNTRUSTEDROOT, indicating the client was unable to establish an IP-HTTPS connection because the certificate presented during the SSL handshake was issued by a certification authority that was not trusted. This commonly occurs when the DirectAccess server is configured with an SSL certificate issued by the internal PKI and DirectAccess clients are provisioned using offline domain join without using the /rootcacerts switch.

Troubleshooting DirectAccess IP-HTTPS Error 0x800b0109

To resolve IP-HTTPS error code 0x800b0109, obtain the root certificate for the certificate authority that issued the SSL certificate used for IP-HTTPS and import it in to the DirectAccess client’s Trusted Root Certification Authorities local computer certificate store. Once complete, restart the IP helper service to reinitiate an IP-HTTPS connection.

Additional Information

Provisioning DirectAccess Clients using Windows Offline Domain Join

Troubleshooting DirectAccess IP-HTTPS Error Code 0x90320

Troubleshooting DirectAccess IP-HTTPS Error 0x2af9

DirectAccess Expired IP-HTTPS Certificate and Error 0x800b0101

Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016

Troubleshooting DirectAccess IP-HTTPS Error 0x80090326

A Windows 7 or Windows 8.x/10 client may fail to establish a DirectAccess connection using the IP-HTTPS IPv6 transition technology. When troubleshooting this issue, running ipconfig.exe shows that the media state for the tunnel adapter iphttpsinterface is Media disconnected.

Troubleshooting DirectAccess IP-HTTPS Error 0x80090326

Running the Get-NetIPHttpsState PowerShell command on Windows 8.x/10 clients or the netsh interface httpstunnel show interface command on Windows 7 clients returns and error code of 0x80090326, with an interface status Failed to connect to the IPHTTPS server; waiting to reconnect.

Troubleshooting DirectAccess IP-HTTPS Error 0x80090326

Error code 0x80090326 translates to SEC_E_ILLEGAL_MESSAGE, indicating the client encountered a fatal error during the SSL handshake.

Troubleshooting DirectAccess IP-HTTPS Error 0x80090326

There are a number of things that can cause this to happen. The most common scenario occurs when an Application Delivery Controller (ADC) is improperly configured to perform client certificate authentication for IP-HTTPS connections. Common examples are an incorrect or missing root CA certificate, or null SSL/TLS cipher suites not enabled when supporting Windows 8.x/10 clients.

To troubleshoot DirectAccess IP-HTTPS error 0x80090326, perform a network trace on the DirectAccess client and observe the TLS handshake for clues as to which configuration error is the culprit. If the TLS handshake failure occurs immediately after the client sends a Client Hello, it is likely that the ADC does not have null cipher suites enabled.

Troubleshooting DirectAccess IP-HTTPS Error 0x80090326

If the TLS handshake failure occurs after the Server Hello, it is likely that the ADC is configured to perform client certificate authentication incorrectly, or the client does not have a valid certificate.

Troubleshooting DirectAccess IP-HTTPS Error 0x80090326

IP-HTTPS error 0x80090326 can also occur if an intermediary device is performing SSL/TLS inspection or otherwise tampering with the TLS request. It can also happen if the edge firewall and/or NAT device is forwarding IP-HTTPS connections to the wrong internal server, or if the firewall itself is responding to the HTTPS connection request. Remember, just because the server is responding on TCP port 443 doesn’t necessarily mean that it is the DirectAccess server responding!

Additional Information

Troubleshooting DirectAccess IP-HTTPS Error Code 0x90320

Troubleshooting DirectAccess IP-HTTPS Error 0x2af9

DirectAccess Troubleshooting Consulting Services

Implementing DirectAccess with Windows Server 2016

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