DirectAccess and the TLS Logjam Attack

Another critical flaw affecting Transport Layer Security (TLS) was discovered recently that could put some organizations at risk. The “Logjam” attack exploits a weakness in how the Diffie-Hellman key exchange is used. An attacker, acting as a man-in-the-middle, can potentially force a downgrade of the TLS connection, resulting in the use of weak cryptography. The Qualys SSL Labs SSL Server Test has been updated to identify this vulnerability. When testing a DirectAccess server you will receive the following warning message.

“This server supports weak Diffie-Hellman (DH) key exchange parameters. Grade capped to B.”

DirectAccess and the Logjam Attack

DirectAccess leverages SSL and TLS as part of the IP-HTTPS IPv6 transition protocol, which is used to tunnel IPv6 packets over the IPv4 Internet. These IPv6 packets are encrypted using IPsec. If an attacker were to break the SSL/TLS connection they would gain nothing. Because of this, a dedicated DirectAccess server is unaffected by the Logjam attack. Mitigating it would provide no additional protection, so you can safely ignore the warning about weak DH key exchange parameters being supported.

However, if DirectAccess has been configured to use one-time password (OTP) authentication, the client-based VPN role has been enabled and configured, or the Web Application Proxy (WAP) role has been installed on the DirectAccess server, then the Logjam attack represents a serious risk and should be mitigated. Also, in some cases it may be desirable to make this change on a dedicated DirectAccess server just to prevent an audit finding and avoid having to explain why the DirectAccess workload would be unaffected by this attack.

To mitigate this vulnerability it will be necessary to remove support for cipher suites that use the Diffie-Hellman key exchange protocol on the DirectAccess server. This is accomplished by opening the Local Group Policy Editor (gpedit.msc) on the DirectAccess server and expanding Computer Configuration, Administrative Templates, and Network. Select SSL Configuration Settings and then double-click SSL Cipher Suite Order. Select Enabled and then replace the default list of cipher suites with the following list.

TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_256_GCM_SHA384_P384
TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_128_GCM_SHA256_P256
TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA384_P384
TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256_P256
TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA_P384
TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA_P256
TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA_P384
TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA_P256
TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA_P384
TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA_P256
TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256_P384
TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256_P256
TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA_P384
TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA_P256
TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA256
TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA
TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256
TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA
TLS_RSA_WITH_NULL_SHA256
TLS_RSA_WITH_NULL_SHA

DirectAccess and the Logjam Attack

Once complete, restart the DirectAccess server. The Qualys SSL Labs server test should no longer give a warning about the use of weak Diffie-Hellman keys. In addition, this reordering and optimization of cipher suites will also improve the protocol support and key exchange scores, as shown here.

DirectAccess and the Logjam Attack

As a reminder, and overall rating of “F” is expected when testing a dedicated DirectAccess server. By design, DirectAccess provides support for null cipher suites to improve scalability and performance for Windows 8.x and later DirectAccess clients. More details here.

How to Install and Configure KB2862152 for DirectAccess

Microsoft recently released security advisory 2862152 to address a vulnerability in IPsec that could allow DirectAccess security feature bypass. The associated update addresses an issue with how the DirectAccess client authenticates with a DirectAccess server. Without the update, it is possible for an attacker to launch a man-in-the-middle attack to intercept DirectAccess communication.

The update itself does not resolve the issue directly, however. The update simply allows administrators to configure DirectAccess clients using specific registry settings to enforce more stringent checks during IPsec negotiation after the update is installed. The challenge with this update is that the documentation contained within the knowledge base article is extremely detailed and includes information that pertains to many different remote access scenarios, not just DirectAccess. This has led to much confusion, and many administrators are unclear for which clients and deployment scenarios the registry changes are required.

For DirectAccess deployments, the update needs to be applied to all of your DirectAccess clients. The update does NOT need to be applied to the DirectAccess server. The registry settings required on the client will be dictated based on the configured authentication method for your DirectAccess deployment. If you have configured DirectAccess to use certificate-based authentication by checking selecting the Use computer certificates option as shown below, you’ll only need to make registry settings changes on your Windows 7 clients. Windows 8/8.1 clients DO NOT require any changes be made to the registry when DirectAccess is configured to use certificate-based authentication.

Microsoft Security Update KB2862152 for DirectAccess

If you are NOT using computer certificates for authentication, then you must make registry changes to all of your Windows 8/8.1 clients. For detailed, prescriptive guidance on implementing the client-side registry changes required to support this update and mitigate this vulnerability, Jason Jones has done a wonderful job documenting those steps specifically, so I’ll refer you to his post here.

You can find the update for KB2862152 for all supported clients here.

Microsoft Security Update MS13-064 and DirectAccess

With the August security update release cycle, Microsoft issued security bulletin MS13-064 to address a vulnerability in the Windows NAT driver that could result in a denial of service. The vulnerability could be exploited by an attacker who sends a specially crafted ICMP packet to the server running the Windows NAT Driver service. The vulnerability exists only on Windows Server 2012 and the affected driver, winnat.sys, is present when the DirectAccess role is installed. This vulnerability only affects only full installations of Windows Server 2012. Windows Server 2012 Core is not affected. If you are running DirectAccess on a full installation of Windows Server 2012, make sure you install this update as soon as possible to be protected from potential denial of service attacks. For more information about this update, click here. For a comprehensive list of updates that apply to DirectAccess on Windows Server 2012 as well as previous versions, please refer to Jason Jones’ DirectAccess hotfix summary page.

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