Always On VPN Certificate Requirements for IKEv2

Always On VPN Certificate Requirements for IKEv2Internet Key Exchange version 2 (IKEv2) is one of the VPN protocols supported for Windows 10 Always On VPN deployments. When the VPN server is Windows Server 2016 with the Routing and Remote Access Service (RRAS) role configured, a computer certificate must first be installed on the server to support IKEv2. There are some unique requirements for this certificate, specifically regarding the subject name and Enhanced Key Usage (EKU) configuration. In addition, some deployment scenarios may require a certificate to be provisioned to the client to support IKEv2 VPN connections.

Server Certificate

The IKEv2 certificate on the VPN server must be issued by the organization’s internal private certification authority (CA). It must be installed in the Local Computer/Personal certificate store on the VPN server. The subject name on the certificate must match the public hostname used by VPN clients to connect to the server, not the server’s hostname. For example, if the VPN server’s hostname is VPN1 and the public FQDN is vpn.example.net, the subject field of the certificate must include vpn.example.net, as shown here.

Always On VPN Certificate Requirements for IKEv2

In addition, the certificate must include the Server Authentication EKU (1.3.6.1.5.5.7.3.1). Optionally, but recommended, the certificate should also include the IP security IKE intermediate EKU (1.3.6.1.5.5.8.2.2).

Always On VPN Certificate Requirements for IKEv2

Client Certificate

Client certificate requirements vary depending on the type of VPN tunnel and authentication method being used.

User Tunnel

No certificates are required on the client to support IKEv2 when using MSCHAPv2, EAP-MSCHAPv2, or Protected EAP (PEAP) with MSCHAPv2. However, if the option to verify the server’s identity by validating the certificate is selected when using PEAP, the client must have the certificates for the root CA and any subordinate CAs installed in its Trusted Root Certification and Intermediate Certificate Authorities certificate stores, respectively.

User Tunnel with Certificate Authentication

Using certificate authentication for the user tunnel is the recommended best practice for Always On VPN deployments. A client certificate must be installed in the Current User/Personal store to support PEAP authentication with smart card or certificate authentication. The certificate must include the Client Authentication EKU (1.3.6.1.5.5.7.3.2).

Always On VPN Certificate Requirements for IKEv2

Device Tunnel

A computer certificate must be installed in the Local Computer/Personal certificate store to support IKEv2 machine certificate authentication and the Always On VPN device tunnel. The certificate must include the Client Authentication EKU (1.3.6.1.5.5.7.3.2).

Always On VPN Certificate Requirements for IKEv2

More information about configuring the Always On VPN device tunnel can be found here.

Additional Information

Always On VPN with Trusted Platform Module (TPM) Certificates

Always On VPN Protocol Recommendations for Windows Server 2016 RRAS

Always On VPN and Windows Server RRAS

Always On VPN Training

Deleting an Always On VPN Device Tunnel

Deleting an Always On VPN Device TunnelWindows 10 Always On VPN supports both a user tunnel for corporate network access, and a device tunnel typically used to provide pre-logon network connectivity and to support manage out scenarios. The process of testing Always On VPN is often an iterative one involving trial and error testing to fine tune the configuration parameters to achieve the best experience. As a part of this process it will often be necessary to delete a connection at some point. For the user tunnel the process is simple and straightforward. Simply disconnect the session and delete the connection in the UI.

Deleting an Always On VPN Device Tunnel

Deleting a device tunnel connection presents a unique challenge though. Specifically, there is no VPN connection in the UI to disconnect and remove. To delete an Always On VPN device tunnel, open an elevated PowerShell window and enter the following command.

Get-VpnConnection -AllUserConnection | Remove-VpnConnection -Force

If the device tunnel is connected when you try to remove it, you will receive the following error message.

The VPN connection [connection_name] cannot be removed from the global user connections. Cannot
delete a connection while it is connected.

Deleting an Always On VPN Device Tunnel

The device tunnel must first be disconnected to resolve this issue. Enter the following command to disconnect the device tunnel.

rasdial.exe [connection_name] /disconnect

Remove the device tunnel connection using PowerShell once complete.

Deleting an Always On VPN Device Tunnel
Additional Resources

Windows 10 Always On VPN Device Tunnel Step-by-Step Configuration using PowerShell

What’s The Difference Between DirectAccess and Always On VPN?

Windows 10 Always On VPN Recommendations for Windows Server 2016 Routing and Remote Access Service (RRAS)

Windows 10 Always On VPN Hands-On Training

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