Always On VPN and Third Party VPN Devices

Always On VPN and Third Party VPN DevicesOne of the most important advantages Windows 10 Always On VPN has over DirectAccess is infrastructure independence. That is, Always On VPN does not rely exclusively on a Windows Server infrastructure to support Always On VPN connections. Always On VPN will work with many third-party firewalls and VPN devices, as long as they meet some basic requirements.

Advantages

Third-party firewalls or VPN devices offer some important advantages over Windows Servers running the Routing and Remote Access Services (RRAS), both in terms of security and performance.

Security

Dedicated security devices (physical or virtual) provide better security than a common Windows server. They commonly run specialized, security-hardened operating systems that are highly secure and resistant to attack. In addition, these solutions typically allow the administrator to define policy to restrict access to internal resources and do so in a centralized way. This is often easier to implement and manage than using traffic filters on the client side. They often include advanced security features such as URL filtering and malware inspection to better protect remote clients. Some solutions include Hardware Security Module (HSM) integration to further enhance security.

Performance

Purpose-built solutions often provide better throughput and performance than do Windows Servers by virtue of their proprietary operating systems. This allows for better network throughput and the ability to support many more connections per device.

Disadvantages

The main drawbacks for using a third-party device are cost and administrative overhead. Third-party solutions must be acquired, for which there is typically a non-trivial cost associated. They often need additional per-user licensing. In addition, many of these solutions require specialized skill sets to implement, manage, and support which could further increase the overall cost of the solution.

Interoperability Requirements

Any firewall or VPN device can be used for Always On VPN as long as they support the Internet Key Exchange version 2 (IKEv2) VPN protocol for remote access connections. Most modern firewalls today support IKEv2, but some (such as the Sophos XG firewall) do not. Check with your vendor to validate support.

Native Client

If the firewall or VPN device supports IKEv2 for remote access connections, the native Windows VPN provider can be used to establish an Always On VPN connection. The native provider is used when the Always On VPN ProfileXML is configured using the NativeProfile element.

Plug-In VPN Client

One crucial drawback to using IKEv2 is that it is commonly blocked by firewalls. Many third-party VPN vendors offer a plug-in client that enables support for TLS-based transport, which is more firewall friendly than IKEv2. Plug-in VPN providers are available in the Microsoft store.

Below is a current list of available third-party plug-in providers for Windows 10. Notably absent from this list is Cisco. Hopefully they will add support for a plug-in client soon. 🙂

  • Check Point Capsule
  • F5 Access
  • Fortinet Forticlient
  • Palo Alto GlobalProtect
  • Pulse Secure
  • SonicWall Mobile Connect

Always On VPN and Third Party VPN Devices

Note: Win32 VPN client applications from third-party vendors are not supported with Windows 10 Always On VPN.

Additional Information

What is the Difference Between DirectAccess and Always On VPN?

5 Things DirectAccess Administrators Should Know about Always On VPN

3 Important Advantages of Always On VPN over DirectAccess

Always On VPN and DirectAccess Scripts and Sample Files on GitHub

Always On VPN and DirectAccess Scripts and Sample Files on GitHubIf you’re looking for specialized configuration scripts for Windows 10 Always On VPN, Windows Server Routing and Remote Access Service (RRAS), or DirectAccess then have a look at my GitHub page! There I’ve uploaded a few tools I’ve created (with the help of my good friend Jeff Hicks!) along with some sample ProfileXML files. Here’s a sample of what you’ll find there today.

Always On VPN

This repository includes PowerShell scripts and sample ProfileXML files used for configuring Windows 10 Always On VPN. These scripts have been adopted from those provided by Microsoft and modified to work with a separate XML file. These scripts can be used for local testing and for deploying Always On VPN connections using System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM). The ProfileXML files can be helpful for those administrators looking for real world configuration examples.

https://github.com/richardhicks/aovpn

SstpOffload

This repository includes a PowerShell script to enable TLS offload for Windows Server RRAS Secure Socket Tunneling Protocol (SSTP) VPN connections when the public SSL certificate can’t be installed on the RRAS server. TLS offload for SSTP can be enabled in scenarios where better security, performance, and scalability are desired.

https://github.com/richardhicks/sstpoffload

DirectAccess

This repository includes the PowerShell script Move-DaInboxAccountingDatabase which can be used to move the DirectAccess inbox accounting database files. The default location of the database files is on the C: drive, and many administrators have encountered disk space issues, especially in large scale deployments. This script will relocate the database files to the location of your choice.

https://github.com/richardhicks/directaccess

More to Come!

Be sure to check my GitHub site for more PowerShell script and sample files on a regular basis. Or better yet, give me a follow! I’ll be sure to post more as time goes on. In addition, I’ll be going through my older articles where I’ve provided PowerShell code samples and will include them in the repository too.

Standard Disclaimer

All the sample files and PowerShell scripts I’ve shared on GitHub are provided as-is. Although they’ve been thoroughly tested, I can’t be certain I’ve accommodated every deployment scenario. Please use caution when running these scripts on production machines.

Additional Information

Always On VPN Hands-On Training Classes 2019

Jeff Hicks’ Blog

Always On VPN IKEv2 and SSTP Fallback

Always On VPN IKEv2 and SSTP FallbackA while back I wrote about the various VPN protocols supported for Windows 10 Always On VPN. The two most common are Internet Key Exchange version 2 (IKEv2) and Secure Socket Tunneling Protocol (SSTP). The article covers in detail each protocol’s advantages and disadvantages. To summarize, IKEv2 provides the best security (when configured correctly!) and SSTP is firewall-friendly ensuring ubiquitous access. Ideally an Always On VPN connection will attempt to use the more secure IKEv2 first, then fallback to SSTP only when IKEv2 is unavailable. Unfortunately, Always On VPN connections do not work this way today.

IKEv2 and SSTP

IKEv2 and SSTP are not mutually exclusive. When using Windows Routing and Remote Access Service (RRAS) as the VPN server, both protocols can be configured and enabled for VPN clients. To allow VPN clients to automatically select a protocol, the NativeProtocolType element in ProfileXML can be set to Automatic.

Always On VPN IKEv2 and SSTP Fallback

IKEv2 with SSTP Fallback?

In theory, with the NativeProtocolType set to Automatic, the Windows 10 client would first attempt to establish an IKEv2 connection, then fall back to SSTP if IKEv2 is not available. In practice, this is not the case.

SSTP Preferred over IKEv2

In operation, setting the NativeProtocolType to Automatic results in the Windows 10 client attempting to establish a VPN connection using SSTP first! If the SSTP connection fails, only then will IKEv2 be used. The only scenario in which I can imagine SSTP failing and IKEv2 being successful would be if SSTP is not supported by the VPN server. Sadly, this scenario may result in failed connections due to a bug in the way ProfileXML settings are processed. Details here.

VPN Strategy

The initial VPN protocol selection behavior is dictated by the VpnStrategy setting of the Always On VPN connection in the rasphone.pbk file. This file can be found under C:\Users\[username]\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Network\Connections\Pbk. The documentation on the Microsoft website is terribly outdated and does not include the following important VpnStrategy settings pertinent to Windows 10 Always On VPN connections.

  • 5 = Only SSTP is attempted
  • 6 = SSTP is attempted first
  • 7 = Only IKEv2 is attempted
  • 8 = IKEv2 is attempted first
  • 14 = IKEv2 is attempted followed by SSTP

Always On VPN Default Behavior

For Always On VPN, when the NativeProtocolType is set to Automatic in ProfileXML, VpnStrategy is set to 6 by default, which means the connection will attempt to use SSTP first. If it fails, IKEv2 will be attempted.

Always On VPN IKEv2 and SSTP Fallback

If the NativeProtocolType in ProfileXML is set to IKEv2, VpnStrategy is set to 7 and only IKEv2 is used. A connection using SSTP is never attempted.

Workaround

Setting the VpnStrategy to 8 or 14 will force the client to attempt an IKEv2 connection first. However, this setting is dynamically updated by Windows and is subject to change. For example, if an IKEv2 connection fails and SSTP is successful, Windows will then set the VpnStrategy to 6 and all subsequent VPN connection attempts will use SSTP first. Because of this it will be necessary to update the VpnStrategy setting each time prior to establishing a VPN connection. This will require some clever scripting and perhaps automation using a scheduled task based on an event trigger. I will leave that custom configuration as an exercise for the reader. If you’ve developed something to address this challenge, please feel free to share in the comments below. 🙂

Additional Information

Always On VPN Protocol Recommendations for Windows Server RRAS

Always On VPN IKEv2 Security Configuration

Always On VPN Certificate Requirements for IKEv2

Always On VPN IKEv2 Load Balancing with KEMP LoadMaster Load Balancer

Always On VPN IKEv2 Connection Failure Error Code 800

Always On VPN administrators may encounter a scenario in which Windows 10 clients are unable to establish an IKEv2 VPN connection to a Windows Server Routing and Remote Access Service (RRAS) server or a third-party VPN device under the following conditions.

  1. The VPN connection is configured using ProfileXML.
  2. ProfileXML includes the <CryptographySuite> element.
  3. The VPN server is configured to use a custom IPsec policy.
  4. The VPN server supports only IKEv2.
  5. The <NativeProtocolType> in ProfileXML is set to Automatic.

When these specific conditions are met, the client will be unable to connect to the VPN server using IKEv2. The error message states:

The remote connection was not made because the attempted VPN tunnels failed. The VPN server might be unreachable. If this connection is attempting to use an L2TP/IPsec tunnel, the security parameters required for IPsec negotiation might not be configured properly.

Always On VPN IKEv2 VPN Connection Failure Error Code 800

In addition, the event log will include an error message from the RasClient source with event ID 20227 that includes the following error message.

The user [username] dialed a connection named [connection name] which has failed. The error code returned on failure is 800.

Always On VPN IKEv2 VPN Connection Failure Error Code 800

A manually configured VPN connection using IKEv2 will connect successfully under these same conditions, however.

IKEv2 Error Code 800

Error code 800 translates to ERROR_AUTOMATIC_VPN_FAILED, which is somewhat ambiguous. The error description is:

Unable to establish the VPN connection. The VPN server may be unreachable, or security parameters may not be configured properly for this connection.

Digging Deeper

A network trace of the IKEv2 VPN connection reveals the true source of the problem, which is a failure of the client and server to successfully negotiate an IKEv2 security association (SA). During the SA initiation process, the parameters offered by the client are unacceptable to the server, resulting in a NO_PROPOSAL_CHOSEN notification being returned by the server.

Always On VPN IKEv2 VPN Connection Failure Error Code 800

Custom Cryptography Settings Ignored

It appears that the Always On VPN connection ignores the custom cryptography settings defined in the CryptographySuite element in ProfileXML. However, this only occurs when the NativeProtocolType is set to Automatic. Presumably, this is a bug. 🙂

Workaround

As a workaround, set the NativeProtocolType to IKEv2. When NativeProtocolType is set to IKEv2, the VPN connection recognizes the IKEv2 parameters defined in the CryptographySuite element and the VPN connection will be established successfully.

Additional Information

Always On VPN IKEv2 Security Configuration

Always On VPN Certificate Requirements for IKEv2

Always On VPN IKEv2 Load Balancing with the KEMP LoadMaster Load Balancer

Always On VPN IKEv2 Security Configuration

Always On VPN IKEv2 Security ConfigurationWhen deploying Windows 10 Always On VPN, many administrators choose the Internet Key Exchange version 2 (IKEv2) protocol to provide the highest level of security and protection for remote connections. However, many do not realize the default security parameters for IKEv2 negotiated between a Windows Server running the Routing and Remote Access Service (RRAS) and a Windows 10 VPN client are far less than ideal from a security perspective. Additional configuration on both the server and the client will be required to ensure adequate security and protection for IKEv2 VPN connections.

Windows 10 and RRAS IKEv2 Defaults

In their default configuration, a Windows 10 client connecting to a Windows Server running RRAS will negotiate an IKEv2 VPN connection using the following IPsec security parameters.

  • Encryption: 3DES
  • Authentication/Integrity: SHA-1
  • Key Size: DH Group 2 (1024 bit)

This information can be obtained by opening an elevated PowerShell command window and running the following command.

Get-NetIPsecMainModeSA | Select-Object -First 1

Always On VPN IKEv2 Security Configuration

This can also be confirmed by viewing a network trace as shown here.

Always On VPN IKEv2 Security Configuration

These IPsec security parameters might have been acceptable in the 90’s, but they certainly are not today. 🙂

Improving IKEv2 Security

To provide a baseline level of protection to meet today’s requirements for security and privacy for IKEv2 VPN connections, the following are the minimum recommended IPsec security parameters.

  • Encryption: AES128
  • Authentication/Integrity: SHA-256
  • Key Size: DH Group 14 (2048 bit)

RRAS Custom IPsec Policy

To implement these recommended security baselines for IKEv2 on a Windows Server running RRAS it will be necessary to define a custom IPsec security policy. To do this, open an elevated PowerShell command window and run the following commands on each RRAS server.

Set-VpnServerConfiguration -CustomPolicy -AuthenticationTransformConstants SHA256128 -CipherTransformConstants AES128 -DHGroup Group14 -EncryptionMethod AES128 -IntegrityCheckMethod SHA256 -PFSgroup PFS2048 -SADataSizeForRenegotiationKilobytes 102400

Restart the Remote Access Management service for the changes to take effect.

Restart-Service RaMgmtSvc -PassThru

Always On VPN IKEv2 Security Configuration

Windows 10 Client Settings

The IPsec policy must match on both the server and the client for an IKEv2 VPN connection to be successful. Unfortunately, none of the IKEv2 IPsec security association parameters proposed by default on Windows 10 clients use 2048-bit keys (DH Group 14), so it will be necessary to define a custom IPsec security policy on the client to match the settings configured on the server.

To configure a matching IPsec security policy on an individual Windows 10 VPN client, open an elevated PowerShell command window and run the following command.

$connection = “[connection name]”
Set-VpnConnectionIPsecConfiguration -ConnectionName $connection -AuthenticationTransformConstants SHA256128 -CipherTransformConstants AES128 -DHGroup Group14 -EncryptionMethod AES128 -IntegrityCheckMethod SHA256 -PFSgroup PFS2048 -Force

Always On VPN IKEv2 Security Configuration

Restore Defaults

In the process of testing it may be necessary to restore the default IKEv2 configuration on both the client and the server. This can be accomplished by running the following PowerShell commands.

Server – Set-VpnServerConfiguration -RevertToDefault

Client – Set-VpnConnectionIPsecConfiguration -ConnectionName [connection_name] -RevertToDefault -Force

Always On VPN XML Settings

To implement a custom IPsec policy using the minimum recommended security settings for an Always On VPN connection using IKEv2, add the following settings to your ProfileXML.

<VPNProfile>
 <NativeProfile>
  <CryptographySuite>
   <AuthenticationTransformConstants>SHA256128</AuthenticationTransformConstants>
   <CipherTransformConstants>AES128</CipherTransformConstants>
   <EncryptionMethod>AES128</EncryptionMethod>
   <IntegrityCheckMethod>SHA256</IntegrityCheckMethod>
   <DHGroup>Group14</DHGroup>
   <PfsGroup>PFS2048</PfsGroup>
  </CryptographySuite>
 </NativeProfile>
</VPNProfile>

Why Not AES 256?

In the examples above you’ll notice that I’ve chosen to use AES128 and not AES256. This is by design, as AES256 does not provide any practical additional security in most use cases. Details here.

Enhanced Security and Performance

To further improve security and performance for IKEv2, consider implementing Elliptic Curve Cryptography (EC) certificates and using Galois Counter Mode (GCM) cipher suites such as GCMAES128 for authentication and encryption.

Additional Information

Always On VPN Certificate Requirements for IKEv2

Always On VPN IKEv2 Connection Failure Error Code 800

Always On VPN IKEv2 Load Balancing with the KEMP LoadMaster Load Balancer

Troubleshooting Always On VPN Error Code 0x80092013

Troubleshooting Always On VPN Error Code 0x80092013Windows Server Routing and Remote Access Service (RRAS) is commonly used for Windows 10 Always On VPN deployments because it is easy to configure and manage and it includes Microsoft’s proprietary Secure Socket Tunneling Protocol (SSTP). SSTP is a Transport Layer Security (TLS) VPN protocol that is firewall-friendly and ubiquitously available. However, a common configuration mistake can lead to failed connections.

Error 0x80092013

A Windows 10 Always On VPN client may fail to establish a VPN connection to an RRAS VPN server when using SSTP. The VPN client will return the following error message.

“Can’t connect to Always On VPN. The revocation function was unable to check revocation because the revocation server was offline.”

Troubleshooting Always On VPN Error Code 0x80092013

The event log will also include RasClient event ID 20227 with the following error.

“The user [domain\user] dialed a connection named [connection name] which has failed. The error code returned on failure is -2146885613.”

Troubleshooting Always On VPN Error Code 0x80092013

The Win32 error code –2146885613 converts to hexadecimal 0x80092013, which translates to CRYPT_E_REVOCATION_OFFLINE, indicating that the client was unable to successfully perform a check of the VPN server’s SSL certificate.

Revocation Checking

When the VPN client attempts to establish an SSTP connection to the Windows RRAS VPN, it will check the Certification Revocation List (CRL) using the information provided in the SSL certificate. If the CRL is unreachable for any reason, the client will not complete the connection

Common Cause of Error 0x80092013

Certificate revocation failures for Windows 10 Always On VPN SSTP connections commonly occur when the RRAS VPN server is configured with an SSL certificate issued by an internal certification authority (CA) and the CRL is not publicly available.

Resolving Error 0x80092013

Making the internal CA’s CRL available publicly will of course resolve this error. However, best practice recommendations for the SSTP SSL certificate call for the use of a certificate issued by a public CA. For detailed information about SSL certificate requirements and recommendations, please see Always On VPN SSL Certificate Requirements for SSTP.

Additional Information

Always On VPN SSL Certificate Requirements for SSTP

Always On VPN ECDSA SSL Certificate Request for SSTP

Always On VPN Protocol Recommendations for Windows RRAS

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