Deploying Windows 10 Always On VPN with Microsoft Intune

Deploying Windows 10 Always On VPN with Microsoft IntuneWindows 10 Always On VPN is the replacement for Microsoft’s popular DirectAccess remote access solution. It provides the same seamless, transparent, always on remote connectivity as DirectAccess. Where DirectAccess relied heavily on classic on-premises infrastructure such as Active Directory and Group Policy, Always On VPN is infrastructure independent and is designed to be provisioned and managed using a Mobile Device Management (MDM) platform such as Microsoft Intune.

Intune and Always On VPN

Until recently, provisioning Windows 10 Always On VPN connections involved manually creating a ProfileXML and uploading to Intune using a custom profile. This has proven to be challenging for many, as the process is unintuitive and error prone.

A recent Intune update now allows administrators to create a basic Windows 10 Always On VPN deployment. Although it still has its limitations, it will go a long way to making the adoption of Always On VPN easier.

Prerequisites

Certificates must first be provisioned to all clients before deploying Windows 10 Always On VPN using Intune. In addition, if using a third-party VPN client, the VPN plug-in software must be installed prior to deploying the VPN profile.

Test VPN Connection

It is recommended that a test VPN connection be created on a client machine locally before deploying an Always On VPN profile using Intune. This allows the administrator to test connectivity and validate Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP) settings. Once complete, run the following PowerShell commands to extract the EAP configuration settings to a file for later publishing with Intune.

$Vpn = Get-VpnConnection -Name [Test VPN connection name]
$Xml = $Vpn.EapConfigXmlStream.InnerXml | Out-File .\eapconfig.xml -Encoding ASCII

Deploying Always On VPN with Intune

Follow the steps below to deploy an Always On VPN connection using Intune.

Create a VPN Profile

  1. Open the Microsoft Intune management portal.
  2. Click Device configuration.
  3. Click Profiles.
  4. Click Create profile.

Deploying Windows 10 Always On VPN with Microsoft Intune

  1. Enter a name for the VPN profile.
  2. Enter a description (optional).
  3. From the Platform drop-down menu select Windows 10 and later.
  4. From the Profile type drop-down menu select VPN.
  5. In the Settings section click Configure.

Deploying Windows 10 Always On VPN with Microsoft Intune

Define VPN Profile Settings

  1. Click Base VPN.
  2. Enter a name for the connection.
  3. Enter a description and provide the Fully Qualified Domain Name (FQDN) of the VPN server. If it will be the default server select True and click Add.
  4. Enter a description and provide the FQDN for any additional VPN servers, as required.
  5. From the Connection type drop-down list choose the preferred connection type.
  6. In the Always On section click Enable.
  7. Select Enable to Remember credentials at each logon (optional).
  8. Click Select a certificate.
  9. Choose a client authentication certificate and click Ok.
  10. Paste the contents of eapconfig.xml (saved previously) in the EAP Xml field.
  11. Click Ok.

Deploying Windows 10 Always On VPN with Microsoft Intune

Define Additional Settings

You can also configure the following optional VPN settings using Intune.

  • Apps and Traffic Rules
  • Conditional Access
  • DNS Settings
  • Proxy
  • Split Tunneling

Deploying Windows 10 Always On VPN with Microsoft Intune

After configuring any required additional settings, click Create.

Assign VPN Profile

  1. Click Assignments.
  2. From the Assign to drop-down menu choose Selected Groups.
  3. Click Select groups to include.
  4. Choose an Azure Active Directory group to apply the VPN profile and click Select.
  5. Click Save.

Deploying Windows 10 Always On VPN with Microsoft Intune

Limitations

Although the ability to provision Always On VPN using Microsoft Intune without using a custom profile is welcome, it is not without its limitations. At the time of this writing, only Always On VPN user profiles can be configured. A device tunnel, which is optional, must be configured manually using a custom profile. In addition, the Intune user interface lacks the ability to define settings for the following parameters:

  • Exclusion routes
  • Name Resolution Policy Table (NRPT) exemptions
  • Lockdown mode
  • DNS registration
  • Trusted network detection
  • Custom IKEv2 cryptography policy

To make changes to the default settings for any of the above parameters, a ProfileXML must be created manually and provisioned with Intune using a custom policy.

Additional Information

Windows 10 Always On VPN Device Tunnel Step-by-Step Configuration using PowerShell

Windows 10 Always On VPN Certificate Requirements for IKEv2

Windows 10 Always On VPN and the Name Resolution Policy Table (NRPT)

Windows 10 Always On VPN Hands-On Training

Always On VPN and the Name Resolution Policy Table (NRPT)

Always On VPN and the Name Resolution Policy Table (NRPT)The Name Resolution Policy Table (NRPT) is a function of the Windows client and server operating systems that allows administrators to enable policy-based name resolution request routing. Instead of sending all name resolution requests to the DNS server configured on the computer’s network adapter, the NRPT can be used to define unique DNS servers for specific namespaces.

DirectAccess administrators will be intimately familiar with the NRPT, as it is explicitly required for DirectAccess operation. Use of the NRPT for Windows 10 Always On VPN is optional, however. It is commonly used for deployments where split DNS is enabled. Here the NRPT can define DNS servers for the internal namespace, and exclusions can be configured for FQDNs that should not be routed over the VPN tunnel.

To enable the NRPT for Windows 10 Always On VPN, edit the ProfileXML to include the DomainNameInformation element.

<DomainNameInformation>
   <DomainName>.example.net</DomainName>
   <DnsServers>10.21.12.100,10.21.12.101</DnsServers>
</DomainNameInformation>

Note: Be sure to include the leading “.” in the domain name to ensure that all hosts and subdomains are included.

To create an NRPT exclusion simply omit the DnsServers element. Define additional entries for each hostname to be excluded, as shown here.

<DomainNameInformation>
   <DomainName>www.example.net</DomainName>
</DomainNameInformation>
<DomainNameInformation>
   <DomainName>mail.example.net</DomainName>
</DomainNameInformation>
<DomainNameInformation>
   <DomainName>autodiscover.example.net</DomainName>
</DomainNameInformation>

Additional Information

Windows 10 VPNv2 Configuration Service Provider (CSP) Reference

Windows 10 Always On VPN Protocol Recommendations for Windows Server Routing and Remote Access Services (RRAS)

Windows 10 Always On VPN Hands-On Training

Always On VPN Windows 10 Device Tunnel Step-by-Step Configuration using PowerShell

Always On VPN Windows 10 Device Tunnel Step-by-Step Configuration using PowerShellWindows 10 Always On VPN and DirectAccess both provide seamless, transparent, always on remote network access for Windows clients. However, Always On VPN is provisioned to the user, not the machine as it is with DirectAccess. This presents a challenge for deployment scenarios that require the VPN connection to be established before the user logs on. To address this issue, Microsoft introduced support for a device tunnel configuration option beginning with Windows 10 version 1709 (Fall creators update).

Want to learn more about Windows 10 Always On VPN? Register for one of my hands-on training classes now forming in cities across the U.S. Details here.

Prerequisites

To support an Always On VPN device tunnel, the client computer must be running Windows 10 Enterprise or Education version 1709 (Fall creators update). It must also be domain-joined and have a computer certificate with the Client Authentication Enhanced Key Usage (EKU) issued by the organization’s Public Key Infrastructure (PKI).

Always On VPN Windows 10 Device Tunnel Step-by-Step Configuration using PowerShell

In addition, only the built-in Windows VPN client is supported for Always On VPN device tunnel. Although Windows 10 Always On VPN user connections can be configured using various third-party VPN clients, they are not supported for use with the device tunnel.

VPN ProfileXML

The Always On VPN device tunnel is provisioned using an XML file. You can download a sample VPN ProfileXML file here. Make any changes required for your environment such as VPN server hostnames, routes, traffic filters, and remote address ranges. Optionally include the trusted network detection code, if required. Do not change the protocol type or authentication methods, as these are required.

Always On VPN Windows 10 Device Tunnel Step-by-Step Configuration using PowerShell

Reference: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/remote/remote-access/vpn/vpn-device-tunnel-config#configure-the-vpn-device-tunnel

Once the ProfileXML file is created, it can be deployed using Intune, System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM), or PowerShell. In this post I’ll cover how to configure Windows 10 Always On VPN device tunnel using PowerShell.

Client Configuration

Download the PowerShell script located here and then copy it to the target client computer. The Always On VPN device tunnel must be configured in the context of the local system account. To accomplish this, it will be necessary to use PsExec, one of the PsTools included in the Sysinternals suite of utilities. Download PsExec here, copy it to the target machine, and then run the following command in an elevated PowerShell command window.

PsExec.exe -i -s C:\windows\system32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\powershell.exe

Always On VPN Windows 10 Device Tunnel Step-by-Step Configuration using PowerShell

Another elevated PowerShell window will open, this one now running in the context of the local system account. In this window, navigate to the folder where you copied the PowerShell script and XML file to. Run the PowerShell script and specify the name of the ProfileXML file, as shown below.

VPN_Profile_Device.ps1 -xmlFilePath .\profileXML_device.XML -ProfileName DeviceTunnel

Always On VPN Windows 10 Device Tunnel Step-by-Step Configuration using PowerShell

To verify creation of the VPN device tunnel, run the following PowerShell command.

Get-VpnConnection -AllUserConnection

Always On VPN Windows 10 Device Tunnel Step-by-Step Configuration using PowerShell

Note: Be advised that the ConnectionStatus is always Disconnected. Hopefully this will be addressed by Microsoft in the near future.

Server Configuration

If you are using Windows Server 2012 R2 or Windows Server 2016 Routing and Remote Access Service (RRAS) as your VPN server, you must enable machine certificate authentication for VPN connections and define a root certification authority for which incoming VPN connections will be authenticated with. To do this, open an elevated PowerShell command and run the following commands.

$VPNRootCertAuthority = “Common Name of trusted root certification authority”
$RootCACert = (Get-ChildItem -Path cert:LocalMachine\root | Where-Object {$_.Subject -Like “*$VPNRootCertAuthority*” })
Set-VpnAuthProtocol -UserAuthProtocolAccepted Certificate, EAP -RootCertificateNameToAccept $RootCACert -PassThru

Always On VPN Windows 10 Device Tunnel Step-by-Step Configuration using PowerShell

Summary

Once the Always On VPN device tunnel is configured, the client computer will automatically establish the connection as soon as an active Internet connection is detected. This will enable remote logins for users without cached credentials, and allow administrators to remotely manage Always On VPN clients without requiring a user to be logged on at the time.

Additional Information

Configure Windows 10 VPN Device Tunnel on Microsoft.com

3 Important Advantages of Always On VPN over DirectAccess

5 Things DirectAccess Administrators Should Know About Always On VPN 

Windows 10 Always On VPN and the Future of DirectAccess

Windows 10 Always On VPN Training and Consulting Services

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