Always On VPN NPS Auditing and Logging

The Network Policy Server (NPS) event log is incredibly valuable for administrators when troubleshooting Always On VPN user tunnel connectivity issues. Administrators can find these pertinent events by opening the Event Viewer on the NPS server (eventvwr.msc) and navigating to Custom View > Server Roles > Network Policy and Access Services.

Event Logs

When configured correctly, event logs will record the disposition of all authentication requests, allowed or denied. The two most common recorded events are event IDs 6272 (access granted) and 6273 (access denied).

NPS Event ID 6272 – Access granted.

NPS Event ID 6273 – Access denied.

Auditing

In some cases, administrators may find none of these events recorded even though user authentication is working correctly. Here, the only events recorded are NPS informational events indicating which domain controller the NPS server is using to perform authentication.

The lack of 6272 and 6273 events in the event log indicates that auditing for NPS events is not enabled. Open an elevated PowerShell window and run the following command to view the current auditing setting for NPS events.

auditpol.exe /get /subcategory:”Network Policy Server”

Open an elevated PowerShell window and run the following command to enable auditing for NPS events.

auditpol.exe /set /subcategory:”Network Policy Server” /success:enable /failure:enable

Group Policy

Alternatively, consider using Active Directory group policy to enforce the NPS server auditing settings. Open the Group Policy Management Console (GPMC) and create a new GPO. Next, navigate to Computer Configuration > Policies > Windows Settings > Security Settings > Local Policies > Audit Policy > Audit account logon events and select the option to audit both success and failure attempts.

Once complete, link this GPO to the OU where the NPS servers reside.

Missing Events

If auditing is enabled and there are no recorded 6272 or 6273 events, the NPS server did not receive any authentication requests from the VPN server. Review the event logs on any other NPS servers if there is more than one configured. In addition, this may indicate that network communication between the VPN and NPS server is blocked. Ensure network connectivity and name resolution are working as expected.

Troubleshooting Guides

Are you interested in learning more about Always On VPN troubleshooting? My Always On VPN book contains an entire chapter dedicated to troubleshooting. Also, my Always On VPN video training course on Pluralsight includes a module on troubleshooting. The video training course is available to Pluralsight subscribers only. If you don’t have a Pluralsight subscription, you can sign up for a free trial here.

Additional Information

Troubleshooting Always On VPN Errors 691 and 812

Troubleshooting Always On VPN Errors 691 and 812 – Part 2

Troubleshooting Always On VPN Errors 691 and 812 – Part 3

Always On VPN NPS Load Balancing

Always On VPN Error 853 on Windows 11

Recently I did some validation testing with Always On VPN on Windows 11, and I’m happy to report that everything seems to work without issue. However, a few readers have reported 853 errors when establishing an Always On VPN connection after upgrading to Windows 11.

Can’t Connect

After upgrading to Windows 11, an Always On VPN connection may fail with the following error message.

“The remote access connection completed, but authentication failed because the certificate that authenticates the client to the server is not valid. Ensure the certificate used for authentication is valid.”

Error 853

In addition, the Application event log records an event ID 20227 from the RasClient source that includes the following message.

“The user <username> dialed a connection name <connection name> which has failed. The error code returned on failure is 853.”

Server Identity

This error will occur when using Protected Extensible Authentication Protocol (PEAP) authentication. Specifically, it can happen when the option to verify NPS server validity by its certificate is selected, and an explicit list of NPS servers is defined, as shown here.

Case Sensitive

In this specific scenario, Windows 11 now appears to be case-sensitive when it compares the NPS server name entered in the NPS configuration to the Subject Name on the certificate returned by the server. For example, if the Subject Name (or Subject Alternative Name, if present) entry on the NPS server certificate is nps.lab.richardhicks.net, using NPS.lab.richardhicks.net will not match and return an 853 error.

Windows 11

Case matching when validating the NPS server certificate is a change in behavior from Windows 10. Before Windows 11, this comparison was case-insensitive, and any combination of case would match if the entire hostname matched. Going forward, it appears Microsoft has also decided to require case matching to validate the server certificate.

Recommendations

Administrators should look carefully at the server certificate issued to the NPS server and ensure their client configuration accurately reflects the hostname in a case-sensitive manner to ensure a smooth migration from Windows 10 to Windows 11.

Additional Information

Troubleshooting Windows 10 Always On VPN Error 853

Windows 10 Always On VPN Network Policy Server (NPS) Load Balancing

Always On VPN Authentication Failure with Azure Conditional Access

Always On VPN Clients Prompted for Authentication when Accessing Internal Resources

Integrating Microsoft Azure Conditional Access with Windows 10 Always On VPN has several important benefits. The most important is that it allows administrators to improve their security posture by enforcing access polices that can be dynamically applied. For example, requiring multifactor authentication (MFA) for privileged users (e.g., administrators) or sign-ins that appear to be risky, the type of device they are connecting with, the health of the endpoint, and much more.

Authentication Failure

When configuring Always On VPN to support Azure Conditional Access, administrators may expeirence a failed authentication during preliminary testing. Specifically, an event ID 20227 from the RasClient source may be encountered with the following error message.

“The user <username> dialed a connection named <connection name> which has failed. The error code returned on failure is 812.”

Looking at the event logs on the Network Policy Server (NPS) server reveals an event ID 6273 from the Microsoft Windows security auditing source with Reason Code 258 and the following Reason.

“The revocation function was unable to check revocation for the certificate.”

Root Cause

When Azure Conditional Access is configured for Always On VPN, a short-lived certificate (1 hour lifetime) is provisioned by Azure. This certificate does not include revocation information because, by design, a short-lived certificate does not need to be revoked. However, by default NPS always checks revocation when client authentication certificates are used for authentication. Since the certificate does not include this information, certificate revocation fails.

Resolution

The way to resolve this issue is to disable certificate revocation checking for Protected Extensible Authentication Protocol (PEAP) authentication requests. To do this, open an elevated PowerShell window on the NPS server and run the following command.

New-ItemProperty -Path ‘HKLM:\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\RasMan\PPP\EAP\13\’ -Name IgnoreNoRevocationCheck -PropertyType DWORD -Value 1 -Force

Once complete, restart the NPS server for the changes to take effect.

Additional Information

Windows 10 Always On VPN Network Policy Server (NPS) Load Balancing

Windows 10 Always On VPN Network Policy Server (NPS) Server 2019 Bug

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