Always On VPN IKEv2 Security Configuration

Always On VPN IKEv2 Security ConfigurationWhen deploying Windows 10 Always On VPN, many administrators choose the Internet Key Exchange version 2 (IKEv2) protocol to provide the highest level of security and protection for remote connections. However, many do not realize the default security parameters for IKEv2 negotiated between a Windows Server running the Routing and Remote Access Service (RRAS) and a Windows 10 VPN client are far less than ideal from a security perspective. Additional configuration on both the server and the client will be required to ensure adequate security and protection for IKEv2 VPN connections.

Windows 10 and RRAS IKEv2 Defaults

In their default configuration, a Windows 10 client connecting to a Windows Server running RRAS will negotiate an IKEv2 VPN connection using the following IPsec security parameters.

  • Encryption: 3DES
  • Authentication/Integrity: SHA-1
  • Key Size: DH Group 2 (1024 bit)

This information can be obtained by opening an elevated PowerShell command window and running the following command.

Get-NetIPsecMainModeSA | Select-Object -First 1

Always On VPN IKEv2 Security Configuration

This can also be confirmed by viewing a network trace as shown here.

Always On VPN IKEv2 Security Configuration

These IPsec security parameters might have been acceptable in the 90’s, but they certainly are not today. 🙂

Improving IKEv2 Security

To provide a baseline level of protection to meet today’s requirements for security and privacy for IKEv2 VPN connections, the following are the minimum recommended IPsec security parameters.

  • Encryption: AES128
  • Authentication/Integrity: SHA-256
  • Key Size: DH Group 14 (2048 bit)

RRAS Custom IPsec Policy

To implement these recommended security baselines for IKEv2 on a Windows Server running RRAS it will be necessary to define a custom IPsec security policy. To do this, open an elevated PowerShell command window and run the following commands on each RRAS server.

Set-VpnServerConfiguration -CustomPolicy -AuthenticationTransformConstants SHA256128 -CipherTransformConstants AES128 -DHGroup Group14 -EncryptionMethod AES128 -IntegrityCheckMethod SHA256 -PFSgroup PFS2048 -SADataSizeForRenegotiationKilobytes 102400

Restart the Remote Access Management service for the changes to take effect.

Restart-Service RaMgmtSvc -PassThru

Always On VPN IKEv2 Security Configuration

Windows 10 Client Settings

The IPsec policy must match on both the server and the client for an IKEv2 VPN connection to be successful. Unfortunately, none of the IKEv2 IPsec security association parameters proposed by default on Windows 10 clients use 2048-bit keys (DH Group 14), so it will be necessary to define a custom IPsec security policy on the client to match the settings configured on the server.

To configure a matching IPsec security policy on an individual Windows 10 VPN client, open an elevated PowerShell command window and run the following command.

$connection = “[connection name]”
Set-VpnConnectionIPsecConfiguration -ConnectionName $connection -AuthenticationTransformConstants SHA256128 -CipherTransformConstants AES128 -DHGroup Group14 -EncryptionMethod AES128 -IntegrityCheckMethod SHA256 -PFSgroup PFS2048 -Force

Always On VPN IKEv2 Security Configuration

Restore Defaults

In the process of testing it may be necessary to restore the default IKEv2 configuration on both the client and the server. This can be accomplished by running the following PowerShell commands.

Server – Set-VpnServerConfiguration -RevertToDefault

Client – Set-VpnConnectionIPsecConfiguration -ConnectionName [connection_name] -RevertToDefault -Force

Always On VPN XML Settings

To implement a custom IPsec policy using the minimum recommended security settings for an Always On VPN connection using IKEv2, add the following settings to your ProfileXML.

<VPNProfile>
 <NativeProfile>
  <CryptographySuite>
   <AuthenticationTransformConstants>SHA256128</AuthenticationTransformConstants>
   <CipherTransformConstants>AES128</CipherTransformConstants>
   <EncryptionMethod>AES128</EncryptionMethod>
   <IntegrityCheckMethod>SHA256</IntegrityCheckMethod>
   <DHGroup>Group14</DHGroup>
   <PfsGroup>PFS2048</PfsGroup>
  </CryptographySuite>
 </NativeProfile>
</VPNProfile>

Why Not AES 256?

In the examples above you’ll notice that I’ve chosen to use AES128 and not AES256. This is by design, as AES256 does not provide any practical additional security in most use cases. Details here.

Enhanced Security and Performance

To further improve security and performance for IKEv2, consider implementing Elliptic Curve Cryptography (EC) certificates and using Galois Counter Mode (GCM) cipher suites such as GCMAES128 for authentication and encryption.

Additional Information

Always On VPN Certificate Requirements for IKEv2

Always On VPN IKEv2 Load Balancing with the KEMP LoadMaster Load Balancer

Always On VPN and Windows Server 2019 NPS Bug

When deploying a Windows Server 2019 Network Policy Server (NPS) to support a Windows 10 Always On VPN implementation, administrators may encounter the following error when attempting to establish a VPN connection on a remote Windows 10 client.

Can’t connect to [connection name].

The connection was prevented because of a policy configured on your RAS/VPN server. Specifically, the authentication method used by the server to verify your username and password may not match the authentication method configured in your connection profile. Please contact the Administrator of the RAS server and notify them of this error.

Always On VPN and Windows Server 2019 Network Policy Server Bug
In addition, an event ID 20227 from the RasClient will be recorded in the application event log with the following error message.

The user [username] dialed a connection named [connection name] which has failed. The error code returned on failure is 812.

Always On VPN and Windows Server 2019 Network Policy Server Bug

Common Causes

Always On VPN error code 812 indicates an authentication policy mismatch between the client and the server. This often occurs when, for example, the server is configured to use Protected Extensible Authentication Protocol (PEAP), but the client is configured to use Microsoft CHAP Version 2 (MS-CHAP v2).

Troubleshooting

Carefully review the authentication policy on both the client and server to ensure they match. Next, enable firewall logging on the NPS server to log both allowed and dropped packets. Attempt another VPN connection and observe the firewall logs. In this example the firewall is dropping packets inbound on UDP port 1812.

Always On VPN and Windows Server 2019 Network Policy Server Bug

Interestingly, the default Windows firewall rule allowing inbound UDP port 1812 is enabled and set to allow for all profiles.

Always On VPN and Windows Server 2019 Network Policy Server Bug

Windows Server 2019 Bug

It appears that Microsoft’s recently released Windows Server 2019 has a bug that prevents NPS from working correctly out of the box. Specifically, it appears the default Windows firewall rules to allow inbound UDP port 1812 (RADIUS authentication) and inbound UDP port 1813 (RADIUS accounting) do not work. As a workaround the administrator can create new firewall rules to allow inbound UDP port 1812 and 1813 and restore NPS operation using the following PowerShell commands.

New-NetFirewallRule -Name “NPS-UDP-1812-In” -DisplayName “Network Policy Server (RADIUS Authentication – UDP-in)” -Description “Inbound rule to allow Network Policy Server to receive RADIUS authentication requests on UDP port 1812” -Group “Network Policy Server” -Protocol UDP -LocalPort 1812 -Direction Inbound -Profile Any -Action Allow -Enabled True

New-NetFirewallRule -Name “NPS-UDP-1813-In” -DisplayName “Network Policy Server (RADIUS Accounting – UDP-in)” -Description “Inbound rule to allow Network Policy Server to receive RADIUS accounting requests on UDP port 1813” -Group “Network Policy Server” -Protocol UDP -LocalPort 1813 -Direction Inbound -Profile Any -Action Allow -Enabled True

DirectAccess IP-HTTPS Not Working Properly in Windows Server 2019

After installing and configuring DirectAccess in Windows Server 2019 you may encounter an error message indicating that IP-HTTPS is not working properly. Looking at the Operations Status overview in the Dashboard of the Remote Access Management console shows that the IP-HTTPS interface is in error.

DirectAccess IP-HTTPS Not Working Properly in Windows Server 2019

IP-HTTPS Route Error

Viewing the detailed Operations Status shows the following error message.

Error: The IP-HTTPS route does not have published property enabled.

DirectAccess IP-HTTPS Not Working Properly in Windows Server 2019

Missing Route

Looking at the routing table on the DirectAccess server reveals that a route to the client IPv6 prefix is indeed missing.

DirectAccess IP-HTTPS Not Working Properly in Windows Server 2019

Resolution

To resolve this error message, add the client IPv6 route to the DirectAccess server’s routing table and publish it. This is accomplished by running the following PowerShell commands on the DirectAccess server.

$IPv6prefix = (Get-RemoteAccess).ClientIPv6Prefix
New-NetRoute -AddressFamily IPv6 -DestinationPrefix $IPv6prefix -InterfaceAlias “Microsoft IP-HTTPS Platform Interface” -Publish Yes

Next, restart the Remote Access Management service (RaMgmtSvc) using the following PowerShell command.

Restart-Service RaMgmtSvc -PassThru

DirectAccess IP-HTTPS Not Working Properly in Windows Server 2019

Once complete, refresh the management console and the IP-HTTPS error message should be resolved and the operations status should state that it is now working properly.

DirectAccess IP-HTTPS Not Working Properly in Windows Server 2019

 

Additional Information

SSL Certificate Conisderations for DirectAccess IP-HTTPS

DirectAccess Expire IP-HTTPS Certificate and Error 0x800b0101

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