Deploying Always On VPN with Intune using Custom ProfileXML

Deploying Always On VPN with Intune using Custom ProfileXMLWhen deploying Windows 10 Always On VPN using Microsoft Intune, administrators have two choices for configuring VPN profiles. They can use the native Intune user interface (UI) or create and upload a custom ProfileXML. The method chosen will depend on which features and settings are required.

Microsoft Intune

Intune has an intuitive user interface (UI) that can be used to configure and deploy Always On VPN profiles to Windows 10 clients. Guidance for using the UI to deploy Windows 10 Always On VPN with Microsoft Intune can be found here. However, Intune does not expose all Always On VPN settings to the administrator, which can be problematic.

Missing from Intune

At the time of this writing, the following Always On VPN settings cannot be configured natively using the Intune UI.

To implement any of the above features or settings the administrator must create and upload a custom ProfileXML.

ProfileXML

ProfileXML is a node within the VPNv2 Configuration Service Provider (CSP). When configuring Always On VPN using the Intune UI, each setting is configured individually. By contrast, the ProfileXML node includes all Always On VPN settings in a single configuration file. It can be deployed using Intune or PowerShell. Sample ProfileXML files for both user and device tunnels can be downloaded from my GitHub repository.

ProfileXML and Intune

I’ve already documented how to deploy an Always On VPN device tunnel configuration using Intune, so this post will focus on deploying the user tunnel using ProfileXML.

Once ProfileXML has been configured, open the Intune management console and follow the steps below to deploy it using Intune.

Create Profile

1. In the navigation pane click Device Configuration.
2. Click Profiles.
3. Click Create Profile.
4. Enter a descriptive name for the new VPN profile.
5. Select Windows 10 and later from the Platform drop-down list.
6. Select Custom from the Profile type drop-down list.

Custom OMA-URI Settings

1. In the Custom OMA-URI Settings blade click Add.
2. Enter a descriptive name in the Name field (this name will appear in the Windows UI on the client).
3. Enter ./User/Vendor/MSFT/VPNv2/Always%20On%20VPN/ProfileXML in the OMA-URI field. I’ve used Always On VPN as an example here, but you can use any text you like. If it includes spaces they must be escaped using %20, as shown here. Also, don’t forget to include the leading “.“.
4. Select String (XML file) from the Data type drop-down list.
5. Click the folder next to the Select a file field and select your ProfileXML file.
6. Click Ok.

Deploying Always On VPN with Intune using Custom ProfileXML

Important Note: The File contents window must show the contents of your ProfileXML. If the contents are unreadable the XML file contains encoding that will not work. If this happens, copy the contents of your ProfileXML to another new text file and upload again.

Assign Profile

Follow the steps below to assign the Always On VPN profile to the appropriate user group.

1. Click Assignments.
2. Click Select groups to include.
3. Select the group that includes the target users.
4. Click Select.
5. Click Save.

Deploying Always On VPN with Intune using Custom ProfileXML

Demonstration Video

A demonstration video with guidance for deploying a Windows 10 Always On VPN user tunnel using the native Microsoft Intune UI as well as custom ProfileXML can be found here. The custom ProfileXML guidance starts at 7:52.

Additional Information

Deploying Windows 10 Always On VPN with Microsoft Intune

Deploying Windows 10 Always On VPN Device Tunnel using PowerShell

Windows 10 Always On VPN IKEv2 Security Configuration

Windows 10 Always On VPN LockDown Mode

Windows 10 Always On VPN Scripts and Sample ProfileXML Files on GitHub

Always On VPN LockDown Mode

Always On VPN LockDown ModeWhen an Always On VPN connection is provisioned to a Windows 10 client, there’s nothing to prevent a user from disconnecting or even deleting the connection. Some administrators have expressed concern about this, fearful that users may disable the VPN to improve performance or circumvent access controls when force tunneling is enabled. Also, administrators may wish to prevent users from accidentally or purposefully making changes to the configuration, or even deleting the connection entirely.

LockDown Mode

To address these concerns, Microsoft included a feature called LockDown mode for Always On VPN. Once enabled, the following conditions apply.

  • The LockDown VPN connection is always on.
  • The LockDown VPN connection cannot be disabled.
  • The user can’t make changes to or delete the LockDown connection.
  • No other VPN connections can exist on the client.
  • Force tunneling is enabled by default (split tunneling in LockDown mode is not supported).

Challenges with LockDown Mode

Always On VPN LockDown mode brings with it some unique challenges, however. Consider the following.

Limited Protocol Support

LockDown mode only supports IKEv2 and the native (built-in) VPN client. Third-party plug-in provider clients are not supported. IKEv2 is an excellent VPN protocol in terms of security, but operationally speaking it has some serious drawbacks.

Force Tunneling Only

LockDown mode uses force tunneling exclusively. All network traffic must go over the VPN connection. However, if the VPN connection is not available, the client will be unable to access any network resources at all, local or remote.

Captive Portal Issues

LockDown mode prevents clients from connecting to network resources from a network with a captive portal.

On-premises Connectivity

In LockDown mode all network traffic must flow over the VPN tunnel even if the client is on the internal network. This also means that if the VPN server is not reachable internally (unable to resolve public hostname, protocols/ports blocked by internal firewall, unable to route to VPN server, etc.) the client will not be able to access any internal or external network resources at all.

Deleting a LockDown VPN Connection

Deleting a LockDown VPN connection is also challenging. Administrators will find that trying to delete it using the UI or PowerShell often fails. To delete a LockDown Always On VPN connection, use psexec.exe to open an elevated PowerShell command window running in the system context using the following command.

.\psexec.exe -i -s C:\windows\system32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\powershell.exe

In the new elevated PowerShell window run the following commands to delete the LockDown VPN connection.

$Namespace = “root\cimv2\mdm\dmmap”
$ClassName = “MDM_VPNv2_01”

$obj = Get-CimInstance -Namespace $Namespace -ClassName $ClassName
Remove-CimInstance -CimInstance $obj

Optionally, download and run Remove-LockDownVPN.ps1 here.

Summary

While Always On VPN LockDown mode might seem like a good idea initially, its implementation is heavy-handed and practically speaking ends up causing more problems than it solves. For administrators that plan to enable this feature, carefully consider the drawbacks and limitations outlined above and their impact on supportability and the user experience.

Additional Information

Windows Always On VPN Device Tunnel Config using Microsoft Intune

Windows 10 Always On VPN Security Configuration 

Windows 10 Always On VPN Hands-On Training

 

%d bloggers like this: