DirectAccess DNS Not Working Properly

Name resolution and proper DNS server configuration is vital to the functionality of DirectAccess. When performing initial configuration of DirectAccess, or making changes to the DNS server configuration after initial configuration, you may notice the operations status for DNS indicates Critical, and that the operations state shows Server responsiveness.

DirectAccess DNS Not Working Correctly

Highlighting the DNS server on the Operations Status page and viewing the details shows that DNS is not working properly with the following error message:

None of the enterprise DNS servers <IPv6_address> used by DirectAccess
clients for name resolution are responding. This might affect DirectAccess
client connectivity to corporate resources.

DirectAccess DNS Not Working Correctly

There are a number of things that can contribute to this problem, but a common cause is an error made when assigning a DNS server to a specific DNS suffix. An inexperienced DirectAccess administrator might specify the IPv4 address of an internal corporate DNS server, which is incorrect. The DNS server IPv4 address should be the address assigned to the DirectAccess server’s internal network interface.

The best way to ensure that the DNS server is configured correctly for DirectAccess is to delete the existing entry and then click Detect.

DirectAccess DNS Not Working Correctly

An IPv6 address will be added automatically. This is the IPv6 address of the DNS64 service running on the DirectAccess server, which is how the DNS server should be configured for proper DirectAccess operation.

DirectAccess DNS Not Working Correctly

Once the changes have been saved and applied, the DNS server should once again respond and the status should return to Working.

DirectAccess DNS Not Working Correctly

Unable to Install DirectAccess Hotfix KB2953212 to Disable NRPT

Last year I wrote about Microsoft hotfix KB2953212 that that allowed users to disable the Name Resolution Policy Table (NRPT) on a DirectAccess client. This hotfix addressed a specific scenario where a DirectAccess client on the internal corporate network could not connect to local resources due to Network Location Server (NLS) unreachability.

When installing this update, you many encounter the following error message:

Windows Update Standalone Installer
The update is not applicable to your computer

Unable to Install DirectAccess Hotfix KB2953212 to Disable NRPT

This occurs because the KB2953212 hotfix was included in KB3000850, the November 2014 update rollup for Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2. You can verify this by opening the Control Panel and selecting Programs and then clicking View installed updates under Programs and Features.

Unable to Install DirectAccess Hotfix KB2953212 to Disable NRPT

If you have the November 2014 update rollup installed there is no need to install KB2953212, as that hotfix is already included in the rollup.

Hotfix Available to Disable NRPT on Windows 8.x DirectAccess Clients

Updated April 9, 2015: The hotfix referred to in this article is now included in the November 2014 update rollup for Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2. You will receive an error message when installing this update on Windows 8.x clients with the update rollup installed. More details here.

The Network Location Server (NLS) is a critical infrastructure component for DirectAccess deployments. The NLS is used by DirectAccess clients to determine if the client is located inside or outside of the corporate network. If the NLS becomes unavailable, DirectAccess clients that are already outside the corporate network are unaffected. However, DirectAccess clients that are inside the corporate network will mistakenly believe that they are outside and the Name Resolution Policy Table (NRPT) will be enabled, forcing name resolution requests for hosts in the internal namespace to be sent to the DNS64 service running on the DirectAccess server. If the DirectAccess server is unreachable from the internal network (a common scenario for a variety of reasons), DirectAccess clients inside the corporate network will be unable to connect to any local network resources by name until the NLS is once again reachable.

Configuring the Network Connectivity Assistant to Allow DirectAccess clients to use local name resolution does not resolve this issue. Although it sounds intuitive, it doesn’t resolve this specific issue where the NLS is unreachable.

Hotfix Available to Disable NRPT on Windows 8.x DirectAccess Clients

When the option to Allow DirectAccess clients to use local name resolution is enabled, the client can only choose to disconnect (use local name resolution) after it has successfully established a connection to the DirectAccess server. If the DirectAccess connection shows that it is still connecting, the option to disconnect is not available.

Hotfix Available to Disable NRPT on Windows 8.x DirectAccess Clients

To address this issue, Microsoft has released update KB2953212 for Windows 8.x clients that allows the disabling of the NRPT regardless if the client has successfully established a DirectAccess connection. With this update, if a DirectAccess client is located on the corporate network and is unable to reach the NLS, the user will be able to disable the NRPT (effectively disconnect DirectAccess) and once again connect to resources on the corporate network.
Hotfix Available to Disable NRPT on Windows 8.x DirectAccess Clients

This update is certainly no excuse not to deploy your NLS in a highly-available configuration using Windows Network Load Balancing (NLB) or a third-party external load balancer (hardware or software), but it can be a life-saver if your NLS becomes unavailable for any reason. I’d recommend deploying this update to all of your Windows 8.x DirectAccess clients soon.

For more information and to download the hotfix, click here.

Troubleshooting Name Resolution Issues on DirectAccess Clients

When troubleshooting name resolution issues on a Windows client, NSlookup is an essential tool. However, it is important to understand that using NSlookup on a DirectAccess client might not always work as you expect. Although using NSlookup on a DirectAccess client will work normally when the client is on the corporate network, it will not provide the correct results to queries for internal hostnames when the DirectAccess client is outside of the corporate network without taking additional steps. This is because when a DirectAccess client is outside the corporate network, the Name Resolution Policy Table (NRPT) is enabled. The NRPT provides policy-based name resolution routing for DirectAccess clients, sending name resolution requests for certain namespaces to specific DNS servers. You can view the NRPT on a Windows 8.x DirectAccess client by issuing the following PowerShell command:

Get-DnsClientNrptPolicy

Troubleshooting Name Resolution Issues on DirectAccess Clients

You can view the NRPT on a Windows 7 DirectAccess client by issuing the following netsh command:

netsh namespace show policy

Troubleshooting Name Resolution Issues on DirectAccess Clients

Here you’ll notice that the namespace .lab.richardhicks.net is configured to use the DNS64 service running on the DirectAccess server at 2002:62bd:d898:3333::1. Notice also that the host nls.lab.richardhicks.net is not configured to use a DNS server. This effectively exempts this host from the NRPT, forcing name resolution requests for this Fully-Qualified Domain Name (FQDN) to be delivered to the DNS servers configured on the network adapter.

A Working Example

With the NRPT enabled, which occurs whenever the DirectAccess client is outside of the corporate network, a name resolution request for app1.lab.richardhicks.net would be sent to the DNS64 service on the DirectAccess server. A name resolution request for technet.microsoft.com would be sent to the DNS servers assigned to the network adapter because the NRPT contains no entry for this namespace. And even though the host nls.lab.richardhicks.net is a part of the internal namespace, a name resolution request for this host would also be sent to the DNS servers assigned to the network adapter because it has been specifically exempted from the NRPT.

NSlookup

The NSlookup utility is unaware of the NRPT. Whenever you use NSlookup it will, by default, automatically send queries directly to the DNS servers configured on the network adapter, regardless of the NRPT. If you wish to use NSlookup to test name resolution for external hostnames, use it as you normally would. However, if you wish to use NSlookup to resolve internal hostnames over the DirectAccess connection, you will need to tell NSlookup to use the DNS64 service running on the DirectAccess server. You can do this by running NSlookup interactively and using the server command to point it to the IPv6 address of the DNS64 service, which you can find in the NRPT.

Troubleshooting Name Resolution Issues on DirectAccess Clients

This also applies to the PowerShell cmdlet Resolve-DNSname. Here you’ll use the -Server switch to specify the DNS64 server’s IPv6 address.

Resolve-DNSName –Server <DNS64_IPv6_Address> app1.lab.richardhicks.net

Troubleshooting Name Resolution Issues on DirectAccess Clients

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