Always On VPN Class-Based Default Route and Intune

`Always On VPN Class-Based Default Route and IntuneIn a recent post, I described how to configure routing for Windows 10 Always On VPN clients. In that article, I shared guidance for disabling the class-based default route in favor of defining specific routes for the VPN client. While this is easy enough to do when you use custom XML (deployed via PowerShell, SCCM, or Intune), there is a known limitation when using the native Intune UI that could present some challenges.

Intune VPN Profile Configuration

Defining specific routes is easy to do in Intune using the native VPN configuration profile. In the Configuration settings expand Split Tunneling and click Enable. The administrator can then add routes by entering their Destination prefix and Prefix size, as shown here.

Always On VPN Class-Based Default Route and Intune

Class-Based Default Route

The limitation with using Intune to configure routes is that there is currently no option to disable the class-based default route as there is with custom XML. This means the routes shown in the example above will be added to the client, but the class-based route will also be added automatically, as shown here (class-based default route highlighted with the arrow).

Always On VPN Class-Based Default Route and Intune

Considerations

In most cases, the inclusion of the class-based default route along with the administrator-defined routes will not be a problem. However, in some scenarios, it could yield unexpected results. Specifically, Always On VPN clients may have unintended access to some networks over the VPN tunnel. This is most significant for the Always On VPN device tunnel, where it is common to limit access to only specific resources using individual host routes.

Workaround

Today there is no option to disable the class-based default route using the native Intune UI. Your only option is to deploy the Always On VPN profile using custom XML, as described here.

Additional Information

Deploying Windows 10 Always On VPN with Intune and Custom XML

Deploying Windows 10 Always On VPN Device Tunnel with Intune and Custom XML

Windows 10 Always On VPN Routing Configuration

Windows 10 Always On VPN Device Tunnel Operation and Best Practices

Always On VPN and RRAS in Azure

Always On VPN and RRAS in AzureWhen deploying Windows 10 Always On VPN, it may be desirable to host the VPN server in Microsoft’s Azure public cloud. Recently I wrote about Always On VPN deployment options in Azure, and in that post I indicated that deploying Windows Server and the Routing and Remote Access Service (RRAS) was one of those options. Although not formally supported by Microsoft, RRAS is often deployed in Azure because it is cost-effective, easy to manage, and provides flexible scalability.

Supportability

It’s important to state once again that although it is possible to successfully deploy Windows Server with RRAS in Azure to support Always On VPN, as of this writing it is not a formally supported workload. If the administrator makes the decision to deploy RRAS in Azure, they must also accept that Microsoft may refuse to assist with troubleshooting in this specific deployment scenario.

Always On VPN and RRAS in Azure

Reference: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/2721672/microsoft-server-software-support-for-microsoft-azure-virtual-machines

Azure Prerequisites

The configuration of RRAS is identical to on-premises, with a few additional steps required by Azure infrastructure.

Windows Server

RRAS can be configured on any Windows Server virtual machine supported in Microsoft Azure. As with on-premises deployments, Server GUI and Core are supported. Domain-join is optional. The server can be deployed with one network interface or two.

Public IP

A public IP address must be assigned to the VPN server’s external network interface, or the internal interface if the VPN server is configured with a single network adapter. The IP address can be static or dynamic. When using a dynamic IP address, configure a CNAME record in DNS that points to the name configured for the IP address in Azure. If using a static IP address, an A host record can be configured pointing directly to the IP address.

Network Security Group

A Network Security Group (NSG) must be configured and assigned to the VPN server’s external or public-facing network interface that allows the following protocols and ports inbound.

  • TCP port 443 (SSTP)
  • UDP port 500 (IKEv2)
  • UDP port 4500 (IKEv2 NAT traversal)

RRAS in Azure

Below are the infrastructure requirements for supporting Windows Server RRAS VPN in Azure.

Client IP Subnet

Static IP address pool assignment must be used with RRAS. Using DHCP for VPN client IP address assignment in Azure is not supported and will not work. The IP subnet assigned to VPN clients by RRAS must be unique and not overlap with any existing Azure VNet subnets. If more than one VPN server is deployed, each server should be configured to assign a unique subnet for its clients.

IP Forwarding

IP forwarding must be enabled on the VPN server’s internal network interface. Follow the steps below to enable IP forwarding.

1. In the Azure portal, open the properties page for the internal network interface for the VPN server.
2. Click IP configurations in the navigation pane.
3. Click Enabled next to IP forwarding.
4. Click Save.

Always On VPN and RRAS in Azure

Routing

Azure must be configured to route IP traffic from VPN clients back to the VPN server. Follow the steps below to create and assign a routing table in Azure.

1. Click Create Resource.
2. Enter “Route Table” in the search field and press Enter.
3. Click Route Table.
4. Click Create.
5. Enter a descriptive name for the route table in the Name field.
6. Choose an appropriate subscription from the Subscription drop-down list.
7. Select the resource group where the VPN server(s) reside.
8. Select the best location to deploy the route table resource from the Location drop-down list.
9. If the administrator wants to have the VPN client IP subnet route information published automatically, select Enabled for Virtual network gateway route propagation.
10. Click Create.

Always On VPN and RRAS in Azure

Once complete, follow the steps below to define the route for VPN clients.

1. Open the properties page for the route table.
2. Click Routes in the navigation pane.
3. Click Add.
4. Enter a descriptive name in the Route name filed.
5. Enter the IP subnet assigned to VPN clients in the Address prefix field.
6. Select Virtual appliance from the Next hop type drop-down list.
7. Enter the IPv4 address assigned to the VPN server’s internal network interface in the Next hop address field.
8. Click Ok.
9. Repeat the steps above for each VPN server configured in Azure.

Always On VPN and RRAS in Azure

Finally, follow the steps below to assign the route table to an Azure VNet subnet.

1. Open the properties page for the route table.
2. Click Subnets in the navigation pane.
3. Click Associate.
4. Click Virtual network.
5. Choose the appropriate Azure VNet.
6. Click Subnet.
7. Choose an Azure VNet subnet to assign the route table to.
8. Click Ok.
9. Repeat the steps above to assign the route table to any Azure VNet subnet that must be accessible by VPN clients. If VPN clients need access to on-premises resources via Azure site-to-site gateway, assign the route table to the Azure VPN gateway subnet.

Always On VPN and RRAS in Azure

Note: Azure only supports the assignment of one route table per subnet. If a route table is currently assigned, the VPN client subnet route can be added to an existing route table, if necessary.

Summary

Administrators have many choices when it comes to support Always On VPN connections hosted in Azure. RRAS on Windows Server can be an effective solution, assuming you can live without formal support. If having a formally supported solution is a hard requirement, consider deploying Always On VPN using the native Azure VPN gateway or another third-part Network Virtual Appliance (NVA).

Additional Information

Windows 10 Always On VPN with Azure Gateway

Windows 10 Always On VPN Options for Azure Deployments

Windows 10 Always On VPN Multisite with Azure Traffic Manager

Always On VPN Routing Configuration

Windows 10 Always On VPN Routing ConfigurationWhen configuring Windows 10 Always On VPN, the administrator must choose between force tunneling and split tunneling. When force tunneling is used, all network traffic from the VPN client is routed over the VPN tunnel. When split tunneling is used, the VPN client must be configured with the necessary IP routes to establish remote network connectivity to on-premises resources. How those routes are established is a common source of confusion. This article provides guidance for properly configuring routing for Always On VPN clients.

Class Based Routing

IP addresses are assigned to Windows 10 Always On VPN clients from either a static pool of addresses configured by the administrator or by DHCP. If split tunneling is enabled, the client will also be assigned a class-based route that is derived from the IP address assigned to it by the VPN server, by default. If the client is assigned an IP address from the Class A network, a corresponding /8 prefix is used. For Class B networks a /16 prefix is defined, and for Class C networks a /24 prefix is used.

As an example, if the VPN server assigns the client an IP address of 10.21.12.103, a route to the 10.0.0.0/8 network is added to the client’s routing table, as shown here.

Windows 10 Always On VPN Routing Configuration

Complex Networks

This default class-based route is of limited use though, and is only applicable when the internal network is simple and VPN clients are assigned IP addresses from the same subnet class. In the example above, if the entire internal network resides in the 10.0.0.0/8 Class A address space, all resources will be reachable by the VPN client. Any resources in the Class B or Class C subnet ranges would be unreachable without additional configuration.

Route Configuration

To configure routing for Windows 10 Always On VPN clients, first disable the default class-based route by defining the following element in ProfileXML as shown here.

<VPNProfile>
   <NativeProfile>
      <DisableClassBasedDefaultRoute>true</DisableClassBasedDefaultRoute>
   </NativeProfile>
</VPNProfile>

Next, enable specific routes as needed by defining the following element(s) in ProfileXML. The example below defines routes for all private RFC 1918 networks.

<VPNProfile>
   <Route>
      <Address>10.0.0.0</Address>
      <PrefixSize>8</PrefixSize>
   </Route>
   <Route>
      <Address>172.16.0.0</Address>
      <PrefixSize>12</PrefixSize>
   </Route>
   <Route>
      <Address>192.168.0.0</Address>
      <PrefixSize>16</PrefixSize>
   </Route>
</VPNProfile>

Once implemented, the VPN client’s routing table will appear as shown here.

Windows 10 Always On VPN Routing Configuration

Summary

Proper routing is crucial for ensuring full network connectivity and access to internal resources for Windows 10 Always On VPN clients. When split tunneling is employed, avoid using the default class-based route and instead define specific routes using ProfileXML as required.

Additional Information

Always On VPN Client DNS Server Configuration

Deploying Windows 10 Always On VPN with Microsoft Intune

Windows 10 Always On VPN Certificate Requirements for IKEv2

Windows 10 Always On VPN Certificate Requirements for SSTP

Outlook Offline over DirectAccess on Windows 10

Outlook Offline over DirectAccess on Windows 10You may encounter a scenario in which Outlook on Windows 10 reports that it is working offline while connected remotely via DirectAccess. The Network Connectivity Status Indicator (NCSI) shows DirectAccess is in a connected state and all other internal resources are accessible.

Outlook Offline over DirectAccess on Windows 10

This is caused by the default settings of the IP-HTTPS tunnel interface on the DirectAccess server not advertising a default route for connected DirectAccess clients. To resolve this issue, enable default route advertising for IP-HTTPS on each DirectAccess server in the enterprise by running the following PowerShell command.

Get-NetIPInterface | Where-Object {$_.InterfaceAlias -eq “IPHTTPSInterface”} | Set-NetIPInterface -AdvertiseDefaultRoute Enabled -PassThru

Outlook Offline over DirectAccess on Windows 10

In the past I’ve heard reports of this setting being overwritten after group policy refresh. Recent testing on Windows Server 2016 does not show this behavior, however. Please report any results you may have in the comments below. Thanks!

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