Error Importing Windows Server RRAS Configuration

Error Importing Windows Server RRAS Configuration Windows Server and the Routing and Remote Access Service (RRAS) is a popular choice for Windows 10 Always On VPN deployments. It is easy to implement and support, offers flexible scalability, and is cost-effective. In addition, it provides support for a TLS-based VPN protocol which is required for many deployments.

Configuration Backup

When deploying RRAS to support Always On VPN, it’s an excellent idea to export the configuration once all settings have been finalized. Often this is done by opening an elevated command window and running netsh.exe ras dump and piping the output to a text file, as shown here.

netsh.exe ras dump > rasconfig.txt

Import Error

Importing a saved configuration is accomplished by opening an elevated command window and running netsh.exe exec [filename], as shown here.

netsh.exe exec rasconfig.txt

Oddly, this doesn’t work by default. The import will fail and return the following error message.

“The following command was not found: ■.”

Error Importing Windows Server RRAS Configuration

Root Cause

Importing the RRAS configuration fails because the default configuration output is saved in Unicode format. Inexplicably this encoding is not recognized by netsh.exe when importing the configuration.

Workaround

Follow the steps below to save the configuration file in a format that can be imported using netsh.exe.

1. Open the exported configuration file using notepad.exe.
2. From the Menu bar choose File > Save As.
3. From the Encoding drop-down list choose ANSI.
4. Click Save.

Error Importing Windows Server RRAS Configuration

Once complete, import the file using netsh.exe exec [filename]. Restart the RemoteAccess service to apply the changes.

PowerShell

Administrators can use PowerShell to export the RRAS configuration and ensure the correct encoding format is used by default. To do this, open an elevated PowerShell window and run the following command.

Invoke-Command -ScriptBlock {netsh ras dump} | Out-File [filename] -Encoding ASCII

Additional Information

Windows 10 Always On VPN and Windows Server Routing and Remote Access Service (RRAS)

Windows 10 Always On VPN Protocol Recommendations for Windows Server Routing and Remote Access Service (RRAS)

Deploying Always On VPN with Intune using Custom ProfileXML

Deploying Always On VPN with Intune using Custom ProfileXMLWhen deploying Windows 10 Always On VPN using Microsoft Intune, administrators have two choices for configuring VPN profiles. They can use the native Intune user interface (UI) or create and upload a custom ProfileXML. The method chosen will depend on which features and settings are required.

Microsoft Intune

Intune has an intuitive user interface (UI) that can be used to configure and deploy Always On VPN profiles to Windows 10 clients. Guidance for using the UI to deploy Windows 10 Always On VPN with Microsoft Intune can be found here. However, Intune does not expose all Always On VPN settings to the administrator, which can be problematic.

Missing from Intune

At the time of this writing, the following Always On VPN settings cannot be configured natively using the Intune UI.

To implement any of the above features or settings the administrator must create and upload a custom ProfileXML.

ProfileXML

ProfileXML is a node within the VPNv2 Configuration Service Provider (CSP). When configuring Always On VPN using the Intune UI, each setting is configured individually. By contrast, the ProfileXML node includes all Always On VPN settings in a single configuration file. It can be deployed using Intune or PowerShell. Sample ProfileXML files for both user and device tunnels can be downloaded from my GitHub repository.

ProfileXML and Intune

I’ve already documented how to deploy an Always On VPN device tunnel configuration using Intune, so this post will focus on deploying the user tunnel using ProfileXML.

Once ProfileXML has been configured, open the Intune management console and follow the steps below to deploy it using Intune.

Create Profile

1. In the navigation pane click Device Configuration.
2. Click Profiles.
3. Click Create Profile.
4. Enter a descriptive name for the new VPN profile.
5. Select Windows 10 and later from the Platform drop-down list.
6. Select Custom from the Profile type drop-down list.

Custom OMA-URI Settings

1. In the Custom OMA-URI Settings blade click Add.
2. Enter a descriptive name in the Name field (this name will appear in the Windows UI on the client).
3. Enter ./User/Vendor/MSFT/VPNv2/Always%20On%20VPN/ProfileXML in the OMA-URI field. I’ve used Always On VPN as an example here, but you can use any text you like. If it includes spaces they must be escaped using %20, as shown here. Also, don’t forget to include the leading “.“.
4. Select String (XML file) from the Data type drop-down list.
5. Click the folder next to the Select a file field and select your ProfileXML file.
6. Click Ok.

Deploying Always On VPN with Intune using Custom ProfileXML

Important Note: The File contents window must show the contents of your ProfileXML. If the contents are unreadable the XML file contains encoding that will not work. If this happens, copy the contents of your ProfileXML to another new text file and upload again.

Assign Profile

Follow the steps below to assign the Always On VPN profile to the appropriate user group.

1. Click Assignments.
2. Click Select groups to include.
3. Select the group that includes the target users.
4. Click Select.
5. Click Save.

Deploying Always On VPN with Intune using Custom ProfileXML

Demonstration Video

A demonstration video with guidance for deploying a Windows 10 Always On VPN user tunnel using the native Microsoft Intune UI as well as custom ProfileXML can be found here. The custom ProfileXML guidance starts at 7:52.

Additional Information

Deploying Windows 10 Always On VPN with Microsoft Intune

Deploying Windows 10 Always On VPN Device Tunnel using PowerShell

Windows 10 Always On VPN IKEv2 Security Configuration

Windows 10 Always On VPN LockDown Mode

Windows 10 Always On VPN Scripts and Sample ProfileXML Files on GitHub

Always On VPN SSTP Load Balancing with Kemp LoadMaster

Always On VPN SSTP Load Balancing with Kemp LoadMaster The Windows Server Routing and Remote Access Service (RRAS) includes support for the Secure Socket Tunneling Protocol (SSTP), which is a Microsoft proprietary VPN protocol that uses SSL/TLS for security and privacy of VPN connections. The advantages of using SSTP for Always On VPN is that it is firewall friendly and ensures consistent remove connectivity even behind highly restrictive firewalls.

Load Balancing SSTP

In a recent post, I described some of the use cases and benefits of SSTP load balancing as well as the offloading of TLS for SSTP VPN connections. Using a load balancer for SSTP VPN connections increases scalability, and offloading TLS for SSTP reduces resource utilization and improves performance for VPN connections. There are positive security benefits too.

Note: A comprehensive reference with detailed, prescriptive guidance for configuring the Kemp LoadMaster for Always On VPN can be found in the Always On VPN Load Balancing Deployment Guide for Kemp Load Balancers. Download this free guide now!

Configuration

Enabling load balancing on the Kemp LoadMaster platform is fundamentally similar to load balancing HTTPS web servers. However, there are a few subtle but important differences.

Health Check

Using a standard TCP port check on the LoadMaster will not accurately reflect the health of the SSTP service running on the RRAS server. In addition, using a simple TCP port check could yield unexpected results. To ensure accurate service status monitoring, it is recommended that HTTP or HTTPS health checks be configured instead.

Real Server Check Method

Open the Kemp LoadMaster management console and follow the steps below to enable HTTP/HTTPS health checks for SSTP.

1. Expand Virtual Services in the navigation pane.
2. Click View/Modify Services.
3. Click Modify on the SSTP VPN virtual service.
4. Expand Real Servers.
5. Select HTTPS Protocol from the Real Server Check Method drop-down list. Alternatively, if TLS offload is enabled select HTTP Protocol.
6. In the URL field enter /sra_{BA195980-CD49-458b-9E23-C84EE0ADCD75}/ and click Set URL.
7. In the Status Codes field enter 401 and click Set Status Codes.
8. Check the box next to Use HTTP/1.1.
9. Select Head from the HTTP Method drop-down list.

Always On VPN SSTP Load Balancing with Kemp LoadMaster

TLS Offload

It is generally recommended that TLS offload not be enabled for SSTP VPN. However, if TLS offload is desired, it is configured in much the same way as a common HTTPS web server. Specific guidance for enabling TLS offload on the Kemp LoadMaster load balancer can be found in the Always On VPN Load Balancing Deployment Guide for Kemp Load Balancers. Details for configuring RRAS and SSTP to support TLS offload can be found here.

Certificates

When enabling TLS offload for SSTP VPN connections it is recommended that the public SSL certificate be installed on the RRAS server, even though TLS processing will be handled on the LoadMaster and HTTP will be used between the LoadMaster and the RRAS server. If installing the public SSL certificate on the RRAS server is not an option, additional configuration will be required. Specifically, TLS offload for SSTP must be configured using the Enable-SSTPOffload PowerShell script, which can be found here.

Once the script has been downloaded, open an elevated PowerShell command window and enter the following command.

Enable-SSTPOffload -CertificateHash [SHA256 Certificate Hash of Public SSL Certificate] -Restart

Example:

Enable-SSTPOffload -CertificateHash “C3AB8FF13720E8AD9047DD39466B3C8974E592C2FA383D4A3960714CAEF0C4F2” -Restart

Re-Encryption

When offloading TLS for SSTP VPN connections, all traffic between the LoadMaster and the RRAS server will be sent in the clear using HTTP. In some instances, TLS offload is required only for traffic inspection, not performance gain. In this scenario the LoadMaster will be configured to terminate and then re-encrypt connections to the RRAS server. When terminating TLS on the LoadMaster and re-encrypting connections to the RRAS server is required, the same certificate must be used on both the LoadMaster and the RRAS server. Using different certificates on the RRAS server and the load balancer is not supported.

Additional Information

Windows 10 Always On VPN Load Balancing Deployment Guide for Kemp Load Balancers

Windows 10 Always On VPN SSTP Load Balancing and SSL Offload

Windows 10 Always On VPN SSL Certificate Requirements for SSTP

Windows 10 Always On VPN ECDSA SSL Certificate Request for SSTP

Windows 10 Always On VPN SSTP Connects then Disconnects

Windows 10 Always On VPN SSTP Load Balancing with F5 BIG-IP

Always On VPN RasMan Errors in Windows 10 1903

Always On VPN RasMan Errors in Windows 10 1903After deploying or upgrading to Windows 10 1903, administrators may find that Windows 10 Always On VPN connections fail to establish successfully. Always On VPN connections continue to work for Windows 10 1809 and earlier clients, however.

Important Note: The issue described in this article has been addressed in KB4505903 (build 18362.267) released July 26, 2019.

RasMan Event Log Errors

When this occurs, the application event log contains an error with Event ID 1000 that includes the following information.

“Faulting application name: svchost.exe_RasMan…”, “Faulting module name: rasmans.dll”, and “Exception code: 0xc0000005”

Always On VPN RasMan Errors in Windows 10 1903 Administrators may find that Windows 10 Always On VPN connections fail after deploying or upgrading to Windows 10 1903. Always On VPN connections continue to work for Windows 10 1809 and earlier clients. RasMan Event Log Errors When this occurs, the application event log contains an error with Event ID 1000 that includes the following information. “Faulting application name: svchost.exe_RasMan…”, “Faulting module name: rasmans.dll”, and “Exception code: 0xc0000005” Root Cause RasMan failures can occur in Windows 10 1903 clients when telemetry is disabled via group policy or the registry. Microsoft has identified the issue and is currently working on a fix. Workaround As a temporary workaround to restore Always On VPN connectivity, enable telemetry on Windows 10 1903 using Active Directory or local group policy, the local registry, or PowerShell. Group Policy Create a new GPO or edit an existing one by opening the group policy management console (gpmc.msc) and performing the following steps. 1. Expand Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > Windows Components > Data Collection and Preview Builds 2. Double-Click Allow Telemetry. 3. Select Enabled. 4. Choose 1-Basic, 2-Enhanced, or 3-Full (do not select 0-Security). 5. Click Ok. Registry Telemetry can also be enabled locally by opening the registry editor (regedit.exe) and modifying the following registry setting. HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\DataCollection\AllowTelemetry DWORD = 1 Note: The AllowTelemetry value can be removed entirely, if desired. PowerShell PowerShell can also be used modify or remove the AllowTelemetry value on Windows 10 1903 clients. Run the following PowerShell command to update the AllowTelemetry setting. New-ItemProperty -Path 'HKLM:\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\DataCollection\' -Name AllowTelemetry -PropertyType DWORD -Value 1 -Force Optionally, run the following PowerShell command to remove the AllowTelemetry setting entirely. Remove-ItemProperty -Path 'HKLM:\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\DataCollection\' -Name AllowTelemetry Restart Required Once these changes have been made, restart the client and test the Always On VPN connection. Additional Information asdf

Root Cause

RasMan failures can occur in Windows 10 1903 clients when telemetry is disabled via group policy or the registry. Microsoft has identified the issue and is currently working on a fix.

Workaround

As a temporary workaround to restore Always On VPN connectivity, enable telemetry on Windows 10 1903 using Active Directory or local group policy, the local registry, or PowerShell.

Group Policy

Create a new GPO or edit an existing one by opening the group policy management console (gpmc.msc) and performing the following steps.

1. Expand Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > Windows Components > Data Collection and Preview Builds
2. Double-click Allow Telemetry.
3. Select Enabled.
4. Choose 1-Basic, 2-Enhanced, or 3-Full (do not select 0-Security).
5. Click Ok.

Always On VPN RasMan Errors in Windows 10 1903 Administrators may find that Windows 10 Always On VPN connections fail after deploying or upgrading to Windows 10 1903. Always On VPN connections continue to work for Windows 10 1809 and earlier clients. RasMan Event Log Errors When this occurs, the application event log contains an error with Event ID 1000 that includes the following information. “Faulting application name: svchost.exe_RasMan…”, “Faulting module name: rasmans.dll”, and “Exception code: 0xc0000005” Root Cause RasMan failures can occur in Windows 10 1903 clients when telemetry is disabled via group policy or the registry. Microsoft has identified the issue and is currently working on a fix. Workaround As a temporary workaround to restore Always On VPN connectivity, enable telemetry on Windows 10 1903 using Active Directory or local group policy, the local registry, or PowerShell. Group Policy Create a new GPO or edit an existing one by opening the group policy management console (gpmc.msc) and performing the following steps. 1. Expand Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > Windows Components > Data Collection and Preview Builds 2. Double-Click Allow Telemetry. 3. Select Enabled. 4. Choose 1-Basic, 2-Enhanced, or 3-Full (do not select 0-Security). 5. Click Ok. Registry Telemetry can also be enabled locally by opening the registry editor (regedit.exe) and modifying the following registry setting. HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\DataCollection\AllowTelemetry DWORD = 1 Note: The AllowTelemetry value can be removed entirely, if desired. PowerShell PowerShell can also be used modify or remove the AllowTelemetry value on Windows 10 1903 clients. Run the following PowerShell command to update the AllowTelemetry setting. New-ItemProperty -Path 'HKLM:\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\DataCollection\' -Name AllowTelemetry -PropertyType DWORD -Value 1 -Force Optionally, run the following PowerShell command to remove the AllowTelemetry setting entirely. Remove-ItemProperty -Path 'HKLM:\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\DataCollection\' -Name AllowTelemetry Restart Required Once these changes have been made, restart the client and test the Always On VPN connection. Additional Information asdf

Registry

Telemetry can also be enabled locally by opening the registry editor (regedit.exe) and modifying the following registry setting.

HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\DataCollection\AllowTelemetry DWORD = 1

Always On VPN RasMan Errors in Windows 10 1903 Administrators may find that Windows 10 Always On VPN connections fail after deploying or upgrading to Windows 10 1903. Always On VPN connections continue to work for Windows 10 1809 and earlier clients. RasMan Event Log Errors When this occurs, the application event log contains an error with Event ID 1000 that includes the following information. “Faulting application name: svchost.exe_RasMan…”, “Faulting module name: rasmans.dll”, and “Exception code: 0xc0000005” Root Cause RasMan failures can occur in Windows 10 1903 clients when telemetry is disabled via group policy or the registry. Microsoft has identified the issue and is currently working on a fix. Workaround As a temporary workaround to restore Always On VPN connectivity, enable telemetry on Windows 10 1903 using Active Directory or local group policy, the local registry, or PowerShell. Group Policy Create a new GPO or edit an existing one by opening the group policy management console (gpmc.msc) and performing the following steps. 1. Expand Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > Windows Components > Data Collection and Preview Builds 2. Double-Click Allow Telemetry. 3. Select Enabled. 4. Choose 1-Basic, 2-Enhanced, or 3-Full (do not select 0-Security). 5. Click Ok. Registry Telemetry can also be enabled locally by opening the registry editor (regedit.exe) and modifying the following registry setting. HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\DataCollection\AllowTelemetry DWORD = 1 Note: The AllowTelemetry value can be removed entirely, if desired. PowerShell PowerShell can also be used modify or remove the AllowTelemetry value on Windows 10 1903 clients. Run the following PowerShell command to update the AllowTelemetry setting. New-ItemProperty -Path 'HKLM:\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\DataCollection\' -Name AllowTelemetry -PropertyType DWORD -Value 1 -Force Optionally, run the following PowerShell command to remove the AllowTelemetry setting entirely. Remove-ItemProperty -Path 'HKLM:\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\DataCollection\' -Name AllowTelemetry Restart Required Once these changes have been made, restart the client and test the Always On VPN connection. Additional Information asdf

Note: The AllowTelemetry value can be removed entirely, if desired.

PowerShell

PowerShell can also be used modify or remove the AllowTelemetry value on Windows 10 1903 clients. Run the following PowerShell command to update the AllowTelemetry setting.

New-ItemProperty -Path ‘HKLM:\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\DataCollection\’ -Name AllowTelemetry -PropertyType DWORD -Value 1 -Force

Optionally, run the following PowerShell command to remove the AllowTelemetry setting entirely.

Remove-ItemProperty -Path ‘HKLM:\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\DataCollection\’ -Name AllowTelemetry

Service Restart Required

Once these changes have been made, restart the Remote Access Connection Manager service (RasMan) using the Services mnagement console (services.msc) or by running the following PowerShell command.

Restart-Service RasMan -PassThru

Optionally, the client can be rebooted to apply these changes.

Additional Information

Windows 10 1903 Known Issues

 

%d bloggers like this: